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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONSERVATION, CHARACTERIZATION, AND EVALUATION OF CROP GENETIC RESOURCES AND ASSOCIATED INFORMATION

Location: Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit

Title: Curation of the U.S. Collection of Warm Season Grass Germplasm

Author
item Harrison, Melanie

Submitted to: International Symposium on Forage, Turfgrass and Biofuel Germplasm Research
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 2, 2010
Publication Date: October 8, 2010
Citation: Harrison Dunn, M.L. 2010. Curation of the U.S. Collection of Warm Season Grass Germplasm. International Symposium on Forage, Turfgrass and Biofuel Germplasm Research. Oct. 2010.

Interpretive Summary: The National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) warm season grass collection located at the Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit in Griffin, Georgia contains a valuable set of plant material available for biomass research. The diversity available in the collection allows for the study of many different types of grasses with high biomass potential including switchgrass, big bluestem, and indiangrass that are native to the United States. Short term goals for these grasses will focus on expanding the diversity of the collection, characterizing the material, and improving germination of the material. Plans for other important biomass producing grasses that are non-native to the United States, such as Miscanthus, focus on collaborating with other countries, such as China, in order to facilitate the acquistion of material to expand the NPGS collection.

Technical Abstract: The National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) warm season grass collection located at the Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit in Griffin, Georgia contains a valuable set of germplasm available for biomass research. The diversity available in the collection allows for investigation of numerous taxa with high biomass potential including switchgrass, big bluestem, and indiangrass that are native to the United States. Short term curatorial goals for these taxa will focus on expanding the diversity of the collection, characterizing the germplasm, and improving germination of the material. Plans for other important biomass producing genera that are non-native to the United States, such as Miscanthus, focus on collaborating with other countries, such as China, in order to facilitate the acquistion of material to expand the NPGS collection.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
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