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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTERVENTIONS TO REDUCE EPIZOOTIC PATHOGENIC BACTERIA IN SWINE AND CATTLE

Location: Food and Feed Safety Research

Title: In vitro comparison of nitroethane, 2-nitro-1-propanol, lauric acid, Lauricidin(R), and the Hawaiian marine algae, Chaetoceros, activity against anaerobically grown Staphylococcus aureus

Authors
item Bozic, Aleksandar -
item Anderson, Robin
item Callaway, Todd
item Nisbet, David
item Ricke, Steven -
item Crandall, Philip -
item O'Bryan, Corliss -

Submitted to: International Journal of Applied Research in Veterinary Medicine
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 13, 2010
Publication Date: September 14, 2010
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/57290
Citation: Bozic, A., Anderson, R.C., Callaway, T.R., Nisbet, D.J., Ricke, S.C., Crandall, P.G., O'Bryan, C.A. 2010. In vitro comparison of nitroethane, 2-nitro-1-propanol, lauric acid, Lauricidin(R), and the Hawaiian marine algae, Chaetoceros, activity against anaerobically grown Staphylococcus aureus. International Journal of Applied Research in Veterinary Medicine. 8:180-184.

Interpretive Summary: Cattle are subject to mastitis, as well as diseases of the rumen such as lactic acidosis, that can impact animal production and animal health. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) often cause illnesses and mastitis in cattle, and it has been proposed to inhibit these bacteria to improve cattle feed efficiency. A series of methane inhibitors that have been proposed for use to improve cattle feed efficiency were tested for their inhibitory effect against Streptococcus agalactia, S. bovis, and Enterococcus faecium in a mixed LAB culture. The commercial product Lauricidin®, which is a monoglycerol ester of lauric acid, showed the greatest effectiveness against all tested LAB, suggesting a potential role as a non-antibiotic treatment against lactic acidosis and mastitis.

Technical Abstract: The gastrointestinal tract of bovines often contains bacteria that contribute to disorders of the rumen and may also contain foodborne or opportunistic human pathogens as well as causative agents of mastitis in cows. Thus, there is a need to develop broad-spectrum therapies that are effective while not leading to unacceptably long antibiotic withdrawal times. The effects of the CH4-inhibitors nitroethane (2 mg/ml), 2-nitro-1-propanol (2 mg/ml), lauric acid (5 mg/ml), the commercial product Lauricidin® (5 mg/ml), and a finely-ground product of the Hawaiian marine algae, Chaetoceros (10 mg/ml), were compared in pure cultures of Streptococcus agalactia, Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus bovis, and in a mixed lactic acid rumen bacterial culture. Lauricidin® and lauric acid exhibited the most bactericidal acidity against all bacteria. These results suggest potential animal health benefits from supplementing cattle diets with lauric acid or Lauricidin® to improve the health of the rumen and help prevent shedding of human pathogens.

Last Modified: 4/20/2014
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