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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BITING ARTHROPODS: SENSORY ECOLOGY AND SURVEILLANCE Title: Geospatial Modeling and Disease Insect Vector Management at the USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology

Author
item Linthicum, Kenneth

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 18, 2009
Publication Date: November 20, 2009
Citation: Linthicum, K. 2009. Geospatial Modeling and Disease Insect Vector Management at the USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology. Presentation at the Tenth Annual Conference on High Technology in Jackson, Mississippi on November 18-19, 2009.

Technical Abstract: Geospatial modeling at the Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology (CMAVE) is used assist in the surveillance of insect vectors and in the management of insect transmitted diseases. The most recent Geospatial Modeling/Technology Transfer success involves the prediction of Rift Valley fever (RVF) disease in humans and domestic animals using satellite-based remotely sensed climate and environmental data to enhance control efforts. RVF is a mosquito transmitted viral disease of Africa and more recently the Middle East that has the potential to affect new ecological habitats globally, including the U.S. It causes 100% abortions in Cattle, Sheep and Goats. It also produces significant morbidity and mortality in some adult livestock populations, and in human populations. In a 1997 outbreak involving 5 countries in the Horn of Africa more than 100,000 animals and 90,000 humans were affected by the disease, and economic losses exceeded $100 million. The RVF early-warning system is used by international organizations such as the WHO, FAO and OIE, and Ministries of Agriculture and Health in various countries to enhance surveillance and start the activation of mosquito and disease control programs. In 2006-2007 early-warnings were initiated for 5 countries in the Horn of Africa and the Global community who are at risk from the spread of the disease. Mitigation activities in Kenya likely reduced both human and animal disease by 10-100 fold over that observed in the 1997-1998 outbreak.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014