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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR ARID RANGELANDS Title: Learning natural resource asssessment protocols: Elements for success and lessons from an international workshop in Inner Mongolia, China.

Authors
item Han, Guodong -
item Herrick, Jeffrey
item Bestelmeyer, Brandon
item Pyke, David -
item Shaver, Pat -
item Hong, M. -
item Pellant, Mike -
item Busby, F. -
item Havstad, Kris

Submitted to: Rangelands
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 17, 2010
Publication Date: June 1, 2010
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/58369
Citation: Han, G., Herrick, J.E., Bestelmeyer, B.T., Pyke, D., Shaver, P., Hong, M., Pellant, M., Busby, F., Havstad, K.M. 2010. Learning natural resource asssessment protocols: Elements for success and lessons from an international workshop in Inner Mongolia, China. Rangelands. 32:2-9.

Interpretive Summary: Assessing the current status of land relative to its ecological potential is challenging. Hands-on training is often necessary to learn how to apply increasingly complex analyses, particularly those that require an understanding of ecological processes. This paper describes eight elements of successful elements of successful workshops, with an emphasis on international workshops: translation, integration of a site potential-based land classification system, integration of quantitative data, participant diversity, participant commitment to training, discussion of applications, connection to decision makers, and proximity of field and classroom locations. The approach is illustrated by data and experiences from a rangeland health assessment workshop in Inner Mongolia, China.

Technical Abstract: Learning to complete natural resource assessments requires hands-on training. This paper illustrates eight elements of successful international workshops illustrated by data and experiences from a workshop in Inner Mongolia, China: translation, integration of a site potential-based land classification system, integration of quantitative data, participant diversity, participant commitment to training, discussion of applications, connection to decision makers, and proximity of field and classroom locations. Success in transferring knowledge is seen via consistent, positive course evaluations by participants, but ultimate success of these types of workshops will be reflected in theparticipants use of the information in future decision making.

Last Modified: 11/26/2014
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