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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SOIL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR DRYLAND AND IRRIGATED CROPPING SYSTEMS

Location: Agroecosystem Management Research

Title: Soil profile organic carbon as affected by tillage and cropping systems

Authors
item Varvel, Gary
item Wilhelm, Wallace -

Submitted to: American Society of Agronomy Meetings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 20, 2010
Publication Date: September 1, 2010
Citation: Varvel, G.E., Wilhelm, W.W. 2010. Soil profile organic carbon as affected by tillage and cropping systems. [abstract]. American Society of Agronomy Meetings, September 1, 2010, Long Beach, California. 2010 CDROM. Abstract No. 236-6.

Interpretive Summary: Reports on the long-term effects of tillage and cropping systems on soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration in the entire rooting profile are limited. A long-term experiment with three cropping systems [continuous corn (CC), continuous soybean (CSB), and soybean-corn (SB-C)] in six primary tillage systems (chisel, disk, plow, no-till, ridge-till, and subtill) under rainfed conditions in southeastern Nebraska presented such an opportunity. Soil samples were collected to a depth of 150-cm in depth increments of 0 to 15-,15 to 30-, 30 to 60-, 60 to 90-, 90 to 120-, and 120 to 150-cm in the fall of 1999 after harvest, 20 years after the tillage and 14 years after the cropping system treatments were initiated. These samples were analyzed for SOC. Significant differences in total SOC throughout the profile were obtained between tillage and cropping systems. Results of these analyses will be presented and discussed.

Technical Abstract: Reports on the long-term effects of tillage and cropping systems on soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration in the entire rooting profile are limited. A long-term experiment with three cropping systems [continuous corn (CC), continuous soybean (CSB), and soybean-corn (SB-C)] in six primary tillage systems (chisel, disk, plow, no-till, ridge-till, and subtill) under rainfed conditions in southeastern Nebraska presented such an opportunity. Soil samples were collected to a depth of 150-cm in depth increments of 0 to 15-,15 to 30-, 30 to 60-, 60 to 90-, 90 to 120-, and 120 to 150-cm in the fall of 1999 after harvest, 20 years after the tillage and 14 years after the cropping system treatments were initiated. These samples were analyzed for SOC. Significant differences in total SOC throughout the profile were obtained between tillage and cropping systems. Results of these analyses will be presented and discussed.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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