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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ENHANCEMENT OF BLUEBERRY, STRAWBERRY, AND BRAMBLES THROUGH MOLECULAR APPROACHES Title: Chilling requirement, cold hardiness and fruiting characteristics of a "Draper" X "Jewel" population planted at multiple sites

Authors
item Hancock, James -
item FINN, CHAD
item Wheeler, Ed -
item Graham, Julie -
item Mccallum, Susan -
item Olmstead, James -
item BASSIL, NAHLA
item ROWLAND, LISA

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 27, 2010
Publication Date: July 25, 2010
Citation: Hancock, J., Finn, C.E., Wheeler, E., Graham, J., Mccallum, S., Olmstead, J., Bassil, N.V., Rowland, L.J. 2010. Chilling requirement, cold hardiness and fruiting characteristics of a "Draper" X "Jewel" population planted at multiple sites. Meeting Abstract. 2010: p.55.

Technical Abstract: A mapping population of 105 individuals has been generated between the southern highbush ‘Jewel’ and the northern highbush ‘Draper’, to produce a genetic linkage map and search for QTL associated with chilling requirement, cold tolerance and fruiting characteristics. ‘Draper’ is adapted to plant hardiness zones 5 – 6 and has a chilling requirement of > 800 hours. ‘Jewel’ is adapted to USDA plant hardiness zone 8 and has a chilling requirement of 150 hours. ‘Draper’ flower buds can tolerate mid-winter temperatures of -20oC, while ‘Jewel’ flowers cannot tolerate temperatures much below freezing. The mapping population has been asexually propagated and planted at five locations including: Gainesville, FL (250 – 350 chilling hours, winter temperatures rarely below 0 oC), Waycross, GA ( 500 – 600 chilling hours, temperatures rarely < -5 oC), Invergowrie, Scotland (greater than 800 chilling hours, temperatures rarely <-5 oC), Corvallis, OR (greater than 800 chilling hours, temperatures rarely <-10 C), and Benton Harbor, MI (greater than 800 chilling hours, temperatures often < -20 oC) . Phenotypic data will be collected on each individual at each site for: phenological traits (dates of vegetative bud break, full bloom, and harvest, and proportion of flower buds damaged by cold), several fruit characteristics ( size, color, firmness, weight, picking scar, Brix, titratable acidity, pH, total solids), as well as plant characteristics (vigor, disease incidence, winter injury). The mapping population will also be evaluated for various nutritional quality traits at the Scottish Crop Research Institute.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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