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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: OBJECT MODELING AND SCALING OF LANDSCAPE PROCESSES AND CONSERVATION EFFECTS IN AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS

Location: Agricultural Systems Research Unit

Title: Integrated agricultural system modeling using OMS3: component driven runoff and nutrient dynamics simulations

Authors
item ASCOUGH, JAMES
item David, Olaf -
item Krause, Peter -
item Fink, Manfred -
item Kralisch, Sven -
item Kipka, Holm -
item Wetzel, Marcel -

Submitted to: Environmental Modeling International Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 15, 2010
Publication Date: December 15, 2010
Citation: Ascough II, J.C., David, O., Krause, P., Fink, M., Kralisch, S., Kipka, H., Wetzel, M. 2010. Integrated agricultural system modeling using OMS3: component driven runoff and nutrient dynamics simulations. In: Swayne, D.A., Yang, W., Voinov, A.A., Rizzoli, A., and Filatova, T., editors. Environmental Modeling International Conference Proceedings. International Modeling and Environmental Software Society, Modelling for Environment's Sake, July 5-8, 2010, Ottawa, Canada. p. 1089-1097.

Interpretive Summary: Challenges in agro-ecosystem conservation management have created demand for state-of-the-art, integrated, and flexible modeling tools. For example, agricultural system modeling tools are needed which are robust and fast enough to be applied on large watershed scales, but which are also able to simulate the impact of changes on single fields or small areas of a specific land use in the watershed. In addition, numerous environmental modeling frameworks such as the Object Modeling System (OMS) are currently under development with the chief purpose of integrating science process components into collaborative and customizable modeling systems. To face these challenges, the new OMS V. 3 was used to combine the fully-distributed hydrological model J2000 with the nitrogen transport and crop growth components of the Soil Water Assessment Tool SWAT model (which are normally applied in a quasi-distributed approach). This combination extends the quantitative focus of J2000 with component-based qualitative processes and helps to overcome the semi-distributed limitation of SWAT. The integrated modeling system was applied to watersheds in Germany and the Midwestern United States and was able to accurately reproduce daily hydrological as well as nitrogen and crop dynamics.

Technical Abstract: Challenges in agro-ecosystem conservation management have created demand for state-of-the-art, integrated, and flexible modeling tools. For example, agricultural system modeling tools are needed which are robust and fast enough to be applied on large watershed scales, but which are also able to simulate the impact of changes on single fields or small areas of a specific land use in the watershed. In addition, numerous environmental modeling frameworks such as the Object Modeling System (OMS) are currently under development with the chief purpose of integrating science process components into collaborative and customizable modeling systems. To face these challenges, the new OMS V. 3 was used to combine the fully-distributed hydrological model J2000 with the nitrogen transport and crop growth components of the Soil Water Assessment Tool SWAT model (which are normally applied in a quasi-distributed approach). This combination extends the quantitative focus of J2000 with component-based qualitative processes and helps to overcome the semi-distributed limitation of SWAT. The integrated modeling system was applied to watersheds in Germany and the Midwestern United States and was able to accurately reproduce daily hydrological as well as nitrogen and crop dynamics.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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