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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DOMESTIC, EXOTIC, AND EMERGING DISEASES OF CITRUS, VEGETABLES, AND ORNAMENTALS (DEED) Title: Update on the watermelon vine decline virus and other whitefly-transmitted cucurbit viruses in Florida, and their effects on watermelon

Authors
item Adkins, Scott
item Webster, Craig
item McCollum, Thomas
item Albano, Joseph
item Kousik, Chandrasekar
item Roberts, Pamela -
item Webb, Susan -
item Baker, Carlye -
item Turechek, William

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 24, 2010
Publication Date: April 1, 2010
Citation: Adkins, S.T., Webster, C.G., Mccollum, T.G., Albano, J.P., Kousik, C.S., Roberts, P.D., Webb, S.E., Baker, C.A., Turechek, W. 2010. Update on the watermelon vine decline virus and other whitefly-transmitted cucurbit viruses in Florida, and their effects on watermelon. HortScience. 45(4):510

Technical Abstract: Whitefly-transmitted Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) was shown in the mid-2000’s to cause a watermelon vine decline in southwest and west-central Florida. More recently, Cucurbit leaf crumple virus (CuLCrV) and Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus (CYSDV), also whitefly-transmitted, have been found in Florida watermelon. Cucurbit weeds including Balsam-apple (Momordica charantia), creeping cucumber (Melothria pendula) and smellmelon (Cucumis melo var. dudaim) can provide reservoirs for SqVYV, CuLCrV and CYSDV. Green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) also can provide a reservoir for CuLCrV. To more fully characterize the systemic wilt and rind necrosis induced by SqVYV, watermelon plants were grown under whitefly-free conditions in a greenhouse and inoculated with buffer (mock) or SqVYV at two week intervals. Symptoms appeared at about two weeks post-inoculation on all virus-inoculated plants but older plants tended to require a few more days for symptom appearance. Virus infection had significant deleterious effects on whole plant fresh and dry weight, fruit rind and flesh color, and soluble sugars compared to mock inoculated plants. However, the effects of virus infection were reduced at later inoculations.

Last Modified: 11/25/2014
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