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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENOMICS AND BIOINFORMATICS RESEARCH IN AGRICULTURALLY IMPORTANT ORGANISMS

Location: Genomics and Bioinformatics Research Unit

Title: Isolation and characterisation of the first microsatellite markers for Cyperus rotundus

Authors
item Arias De Ares, Renee
item Molin, William
item Ray, Jeffery
item Peel, Michael
item Scheffler, Brian

Submitted to: Weed Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 25, 2011
Publication Date: October 1, 2011
Citation: Arias, R.S., Molin, W.T., Ray, J.D., Peel, M., Scheffler, B.E. 2011. Isolation and characterisation of the first microsatellite markers for Cyperus rotundus. Weed Research. 51:451-460.

Interpretive Summary: Purple nutsedge, is a weed that affects crops such as cotton, soybean and vegetables, mainly in the South of the United States. Though morphological differences were observed on purple nutsedge from different countries around the world, the molecular techniques used so far could not detect genetic variation among purple nutsedge from within the United States. Knowing if genetic variation exists is essential to develop strategic control practices for this weed, as differences in their genome could be related to resistance to chemical or biological control methods. We have developed a large number of molecular markers and tested on sample from 10 different countries and samples from the USA. The genetic diversity found among samples from continental USA, indicates that these markers could assist in developing strategies to manage and/or control this weed.

Technical Abstract: Cyperus rotundus L. (purple nutsedge), is a weed that affects crops as cotton, soybean and vegetables, mainly in the South of the United States. We have developed 191 microsatellite markers, 39% of them being polymorphic when tested on 13 accessions of this weed. The microsatellites evidenced genetic distances among accessions from 10 different countries around the world, and also among accessions from within the USA. This variation has not been observed in reports where other molecular techniques were used such as RAPDs (random amplified polymorphic DNA). The knowledge of genetic diversity in weeds is essential for the development of chemical and biological control practices, as these markers can be associated to herbicide resistance or certain biotypes with different response to biocontrol agents. The main advantages of microsatellites over other molecular tools are their reproducibility, co-dominant inheritance, transferability, sensitivity, and low cost. Thus, the microsatellites reported here should become a valuable tool developing strategic control practices for this weed

Last Modified: 4/20/2014
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