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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: VALUABLE POLYSACCHARIDE-BASED PRODUCTS FROM SUGAR BEET PULP AND CITRUS PEEL

Location: Dairy and Functional Foods

Title: Inhibition by pectic oligosaccharides of the invasion of undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells by Campylobacter jejuni

Authors
item Ganan, M -
item Collins, M -
item Rastall, R -
item Hotchkiss, Arland
item Chau, Hoa
item Carrascosa, A -
item Martinez-Rodreguez, A -

Submitted to: International Journal of Food Microbiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 4, 2009
Publication Date: February 28, 2010
Citation: Ganan, M., Collins, M., Rastall, R., Hotchkiss, A.T., Chau, H.K., Carrascosa, A.V., Martinez-Rodreguez, A.J. 2010. Inhibition by pectic oligosaccharides of the invasion of undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells by Campylobacter jejuni. International Journal of Food Microbiology. 137:181-185.

Interpretive Summary: Agricultural residues remaining after fruit and vegetable processing, such as orange peels and sugar beet pulp, represent an underutilized domestic resource of valuable health-promoting compounds. These residues have been used as cattle feed ingredients, but as such their value is low (under $0.05/pound) and there is frequently more supply than demand for this application. However, carbohydrates are found in agricultural residues that can stimulate the growth of health-promoting bacteria while limiting the growth of pathogens in the colon of animals who consume them. We found that citrus peel pectin fragments inhibited pathogen invasion of cells lining the colon. Therefore, these carbohydrates have potential to prevent diarrhea caused by pathogen infection of poultry. Commercialization of these new carbohydrates will add value to the U.S. citrus crop, as well as their processing industry, and will also benefit consumers.

Technical Abstract: The ability of pectic oligosaccharides (POS) to inhibit adherence to and invasion of undifferentiated (UC) and differentiated (DC) Caco-2 cells by Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) was investigated. It was observed that both adherence and invasion were significantly higher in UC than in DC. POS (2.5 mg/ml) had no significant effect on the number of bacteria which can adhere to cells, but they significantly inhibited cell invasion. The anti-invasive effect of POS was dependent on its concentration, although the entire range tested (from 2.5 mg/ml to 0.05 mg/ml) was capable of inhibiting the invasion of Caco-2 cells by Campylobacter to some degree. The pre-incubation or not of C. jejuni with POS did not influence the behavior observed. The results obtained in this work suggest that POS could be potentially useful as alternatives to antibiotics in the control of C. jejuni.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014