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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ECOLOGY, SAMPLING, AND MODELING OF INSECT PESTS OF STORED GRAIN, PROCESSING FACILITIES, AND WAREHOUSES

Location: Stored Product Insect Research Unit

Title: Reproductive Parameters of the Parthenogenetic Psocid Lepinotus reticulatus (Psocoptera: Trogiidae) at Constant Temperatures

Authors
item Opit, George -
item Throne, James
item Payton, M -

Submitted to: Environmental Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 5, 2010
Publication Date: June 1, 2010
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/43392
Citation: Opit, G.P., Throne, J.E., Payton, M.E. 2010. Reproductive Parameters of the Parthenogenetic Psocid Lepinotus reticulatus (Psocoptera: Trogiidae) at Constant Temperatures. Environmental Entomology. 39: 1004-1011. DOI: 10.1603/EN10011.

Interpretive Summary: Psocids, which are minute insects that are often called booklice, are pests in grain storages, grain processing facilities, and product warehouses in the United States and many other countries. A little studied psocid species, Lepinotus reticulatus, is a pest of stored commodities throughout the world. Development of an effective pest management program for L. reticulatus is dependent on having sound knowledge of its biology and population dynamics. We determined preoviposition period (number of days before adult females start laying eggs), oviposition period (number of days that adult females lay eggs), fecundity (number of eggs laid per female), postoviposition period (number of days after adult females stop laying eggs and before they die), and longevity (adult life span) of this psocid at temperatures from 72.5 to 95 degrees F. This information can be used in simulation models to predict L. reticulatus population dynamics and to improve pest management strategies.

Technical Abstract: We investigated the effects of temperature on the reproductive parameters of the parthenogenetic psocid Lepinotus reticulatus Enderlein. The lowest fecundity (21) was at 35 degrees C and the highest (41) at 27.5 degrees C. At 22.5, 25, and 27.5 degrees C, peak oviposition rates (eggs/female/week) occurred in week 3 and were 4.7, 6.6, and 7.8, respectively; also 51, 57, and 62%, respectively, of all eggs were laid in the first four weeks. At 30, 32.5, and 35 degrees C, peak oviposition rates occurred in week 2 and were 8.2, 9.0, and 7.4, respectively; 80, 85, and 98%, respectively, of all eggs were laid in the first four weeks. The longest preoviposition period (4.4 d) was at 22.5 and 25 degrees C and the longest postoviposition period (13.1 d) was at 22.5 degrees C. Oviposition period and longevity decreased with increasing temperature; at 22.5 degrees C, these parameters were 66 and 83 d, respectively, and at 35 degrees C, they were 18 and 24 d, respectively. Mean weekly oviposition rate increased with temperature and was highest at 32.5 degrees C (5.8 eggs/female/wk). At 22.5, 25, 27.5, 30, 32.5, and 35 degrees C, it took 29, 20, 12, 11, 8, and 6 wk, respectively, for all females to die. Intrinsic rate of population increase increased with temperature until 32.5 degrees C (0.128) and then declined. We have developed temperature-dependent equations for preoviposition period, postoviposition period, oviposition period, oviposition rate, and longevity. Reproductive parameters affect population dynamics and information on these parameters can be used in simulation models to predict L. reticulatus population dynamics to aid in developing effective management strategies.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014