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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENETIC ENHANCEMENT OF POTATOES FOR NUTRITIONAL AND PROCESSING QUALITY AND FOR RESISTANCE TO DISEASES

Location: Genetic Improvement of Fruits and Vegetables

Title: Linkage mapping and QTL analysis of agronomic traits in tetraploid potato (Solanum tuberosum subsp. tuberosum)

Authors
item Mccord, P -
item Sosinski, B -
item Haynes, Kathleen
item Clough, M -
item Yencho, G -

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 15, 2010
Publication Date: December 28, 2010
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/49697
Citation: Mccord, P.H., Sosinski, B.R., Haynes, K.G., Clough, M.E., Yencho, G.C. 2010. Linkage mapping and QTL analysis of agronomic traits in tetraploid potato (Solanum tuberosum subsp. tuberosum). Crop Science. 51:771-785.

Interpretive Summary: Potato is one of the most important food crops in the world. Developing potato varieties with improved characteristics could be facilitated if genes governing these traits were found. In this study we identified areas on potato chromosomes that govern flower color, foliage maturity, tuber skin texture, dry matter content, specific gravity, and yield. This information will help geneticists pinpoint agronomically important potato genes in the future.

Technical Abstract: Potato (Solanum tuberosum L) is one of the world’s most important food crops. Using a tetraploid population, we developed a linkage map using AFLP and SSR markers, and searched for QTL via interval mapping and single-marker ANOVA. QTL were detected for flower color, foliage maturity, tuber skin texture, dry matter content, specific gravity, and yield. Most linkage groups were anchored to Solanum chromosomes using SSRs. The most significant QTL detected was for flower color. It was located on chromosome II and explained over 40% of the variation for this trait. This QTL most likely corresponds to the R locus for red anthocyanin production. We also confirmed the presence of QTL for foliage maturity on chromosomes III and V. For skin texture, a trait that has not been previously mapped in potato, we detected multiple QTL. One of these, found on chromosome III, explained more than 20% of the variation. By measuring specific gravity and dry matter independently we were able to detect QTL for these two traits that did not co-locate, even though the traits are strongly correlated. In general, yield QTL were detected in one season only. Most QTL accounted for 4.3-17.9% of observed variation. Many QTL could be modeled as simplex or duplex with dominant effects, but a large number displayed additive or inter-allelic interactive effects. The mapping and modeling of traits in this tetraploid population could be improved by the use of more co-dominant markers, such as SNPs.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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