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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT OF INTEGRATED SYSTEMS FOR SUBTROPICAL/TROPICAL FRUIT CROP PRODUCTION

Location: Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research

Title: First report of sooty mold of longan (Dimocarpus longan L.) caused by Tripospermum porosporiferum Matsushima and T. variabile Matsushima in Puerto Rico

Authors
item Serrato, Luz -
item Rivera Vargas, Lydia -
item GOENAGA, RICARDO

Submitted to: Journal of Agriculture of the University of Puerto Rico
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 7, 2010
Publication Date: October 27, 2010
Citation: Serrato, L.M., Rivera Vargas, L.I., Goenaga, R.J. 2010. First report of sooty mold of longan (Dimocarpus longan L.) caused by Tripospermum porosporiferum Matsushima and T. variabile Matsushima in Puerto Rico. Journal of Agriculture of the University of Puerto Rico. 94(3-4):285-287.

Interpretive Summary: Fungi are a very large and diverse group of organisms that cause serious diseases of crop and forest plants. Accurate knowledge of fungi is critical for controlling the diseases they cause. Longan is a tropical plant that produces delicious edible fruits. In this research, fungi that cause sooty mold in fruit were discovered for the first time in Puerto Rico in longan trees. This pathogen was originally described from Malaysia. Knowledge of the identity of this plant pathogen is the first step to assess the impact of these fungi on production of trees cultivated near bodies of water where these fungi are most commonly found and to develop control measures, if necessary.

Technical Abstract: A sooty mold disease on longan (Dimocarpus longan L.) was found on trees growing close to bodies of water in Puerto Rico. On the basis of the morphological characters the fungi associated with this disease were identified as Tripospermum porosporiferum Matsushima and T. variabile Matsushima. T. porosporiferum produced hyaline to pale brown tri or tetraradiate conidia. Conidia (40 x 6.6 µm) have four septate appendages, with a shorter two-celled axis 16 µm long. Conidia are constricted at septa. T. variabile produced pale brown, triradiate (T-shape) conidia (36 x 6.6 µm) with main axis not bent back. Conidia are constricted at septa and the shorter part of axis which is 6.39 µm long. Both organisms have been reported in Puerto Rico in decaying vegetation in bodies of water. Studies will be initiated to assess the impact of these fungi on production of trees cultivated near bodies of water where these fungi are most commonly found.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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