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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: NEW APPROACHES FOR INSECT PEST MANAGEMENT IN VEGETABLE CROPS

Location: Vegetable Research

Title: Plant Phenolics as Radiation Protectants For The Beet Armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Nucleopolyhedrovirus

Authors
item Shapiro, M -
item El Salamouny, S -
item Shepard, B -
item Jackson, David

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Urban Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 21, 2009
Publication Date: December 6, 2009
Citation: Shapiro, M., El Salamouny, S., Shepard, B.M., Jackson, D.M. 2009. Plant Phenolics as Radiation Protectants For The Beet Armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Nucleopolyhedrovirus. Journal of Agricultural and Urban Entomology. 26:1-10.

Interpretive Summary: One limitation to using naturally occurring insect viruses for pest management is that they are quickly degraded by ultraviolet (UV) light when applied in the field. Thus, it is important to find materials that will protect insect viruses from sunlight. We tested 13 naturally occurring phenolic compounds found in tea as UV protectants for a virus of the beet armyworm, a major pest of vegetables in the US. Eleven phenolic compounds provided good to excellent UV protection when used at a low concentration These compounds may provide protection to a wide variety of viruses useful for management of insect pests on vegetables and other crops.

Technical Abstract: Thirteen phenolics were tested as ultraviolet (UV) protectants for the nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV) of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner). After 30 minute exposure to UVB/UVB radiation, eleven SeMNPV/phenolic combinations provided good to excellent UV protection when used at a concentration of 0.050M. At a concentration of 0.0050M caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, esculin, gallic acid, and tannic acid still showed good UV protection activity. As the concentration was reduced to 0.0005M, only caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, and gallic acid provided some UV protection.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
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