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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVING BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SUSTAINABLE FUELS AND CHEMICALS

Location: Renewable Product Technology Research Unit

Title: The Crossover Biorefinery in The Production of Liquid Biofuels and Bioderived Chemicals from Biomass: Emerging Technologies

Authors
item Hughes, Stephen
item Tasaki, Ken -

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 27, 2010
Publication Date: January 27, 2010
Citation: Hughes, S.R., Tasaki, K. 2010. The crossover biorefinery in the production of liquid biofuels and bioderived chemicals from biomass: Emerging technologies and regulations [abstract]. LabAutomation 2010. Talk 10. p. 6.

Technical Abstract: Energy security and climate change imperatives require large-scale substitution of petroleum-based fuels over the next 15 years. Biofuels offer a diverse range of promising alternatives. Biomass is the only known, large-scale, renewable resource that can be converted into liquid fuels for transportation. Cellulosic ethanol and other advanced biofuels from lignocellulosic, cellulosic, or universal sugar feedstocks is particularly promising because it can capitalize on the power of biotechnology to reduce costs, is derived from low-cost and plentiful feedstocks, can achieve high yields, can have high octane and other desirable fuel properties, and is more environmentally friendly than crude oil derived fossil fuels. Lignocellulosic feedstocks, such as switchgrass, woody plants, mixtures of prairie grasses, agricultural residues, municipal waste, and universal sugar feedstocks such as energy milo and energy cane and cane hybrids have been proposed to offer environmental and economic advantages over current biofuel sources. Advanced biofuels companies coordinated with government research efforts in the business of using biomass sugars for fermentation can rely on a sustainable source of low-cost material from plants, trees, and algaes. This alternative source of sugars can be exploited to fill the growing demand for transportation biofuels and bioderived chemicals.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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