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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENETICS OF THE PATHOGEN-HOST INTERACTION IN SNAP BEAN, TOMATO, AND POTATO Title: Quantification of the Ratio of Plastid to Chromosomal Genome in Leaf and Root Tissue of Carrot (Daucus Carota) Using Real Time Quantitative PCR

Authors
item Bowman, Megan -
item Willis, David
item Simon, Philipp

Submitted to: Plant and Animal Genome Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 9, 2009
Publication Date: January 9, 2010
Citation: Bowman, M.J., Willis, D.K., Simon, P.W. 2010. Quantification of the Ratio of Plastid to Chromosomal Genome in Leaf and Root Tissue of Carrot (Daucus Carota) Using Real Time Quantitative PCR [abstract]. Plant and Animal Genome Conference. p. 114.

Technical Abstract: Carrot (Daucus carota), is an important horticultural crop with significant health benefits associated with providing pro-vitamin A carotenoids in the human diet. These carotenoid pigments primarily serve as photoprotectants during photosynthesis, but also provide pigment to attract pollinators and can accumulate in storage roots, as is found in carrot. While much is understood about the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in plants, the mechanism of accumulation, particularly in root tissue, is not well understood. Carotenoid pigments accumulate in chromoplasts, non-chlorophyll containing plastids, so plastid development is closely associated with carotenoid accumulation. This study was focused on understanding how the ratio of plastid to chromosomal genome change as carotenoid pigment differs. Using the single copy chromosomal and plastid genes, the ratio of plastid to chromosomal signal was quantified with real-time qPCR. These genome markers were evaluated across root and leaf tissue from various pigmented carrot materials, and have established a baseline for understanding the role of plastid development in carotenoid metabolism and accumulation.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014