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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Evaluation, Enhancement, Genetics and Breeding of Lettuce, Spinach, and Melon

Location: Crop Improvement and Protection Research

Title: Turkmenistan Melon (Cucumis melo), and Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) Germplasm Expedition 2008.

Authors
item McCreight, James
item Kokanova, Ejebay -
item Wehner, Todd -
item Davis, Angela

Submitted to: Cucurbitaceae Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 13, 2010
Publication Date: November 14, 2010
Citation: Mccreight, J.D., Kokanova, E., Wehner, T.C., Davis, A.R. 2010. Turkmenistan Melon (Cucumis melo), and Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) Germplasm Expedition 2008.. Cucurbitaceae Proceedings.

Interpretive Summary: Turkmenistan has a rich tradition of melon (Cucumis melo L.) and watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai) production, but like in many countries land races and old varieties are in danger of genetic erosion. In July-August 2008, a collaborative Turkmenistan–United States germplasm expedition to all welayats (states) of Turkmenistan collected 96 melon and watermelon cultigens (land races, old and new varieties, and selections) from farmers, selectionists, breeders, wholesale fruit markets and a seed dealer. The melon portion (74 accessions) included 60 distinct cultigens, including eight in duplicate, plus an unnamed one from a seed dealer. The watermelon portion (22 accessions) included 19 cultigens, including two in duplicate, plus one unnamed one from a seed dealer. Seeds of each accession were divided between the Turkmenistan Institute for Desert, Flora and Fauna, and the United States Dept. of Agric., National Plant Germplasm System. Opportunities for collaborative disease and insect control research were identified.

Technical Abstract: Turkmenistan has a rich tradition of melon (Cucumis melo L.) and watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai) production, but like in many countries land races and old varieties are in danger of genetic erosion. In July-August 2008, a collaborative Turkmenistan–United States germplasm expedition to all welayats (states) of Turkmenistan collected 96 melon and watermelon cultigens (land races, old and new varieties, and selections) from farmers, selectionists, breeders, wholesale fruit markets and a seed dealer. The melon portion (74 accessions) included 60 distinct cultigens, including eight in duplicate, plus an unnamed one from a seed dealer. The watermelon portion (22 accessions) included 19 cultigens, including two in duplicate, plus one unnamed one from a seed dealer. Seeds of each accession were divided between the Turkmenistan Institute for Desert, Flora and Fauna, and the United States Dept. of Agric., National Plant Germplasm System. Opportunities for collaborative disease and insect control research were identified.

Last Modified: 8/21/2014
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