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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVED FORAGE AND BIOENERGY PLANTS AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE CENTRAL USA

Location: Grain, Forage & Bioenergy Research

Title: Characterization of Peroxidase Changes in Resistant and Susceptible Warm- Season Turfgrasses Challenged by Blissus Occiduus

Authors
item Gulsen, Osman -
item Eickhoff, Thomas -
item Heng-Moss, Tiffany -
item Shearman, Robert -
item Baxendale, Frederick -
item Sarath, Gautam
item Lee, Donald -
item Nabity, Paul -

Submitted to: Arthropod-Plant Interactions
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 5, 2010
Publication Date: March 1, 2010
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/44296
Citation: Gulsen, O., Eickhoff, T., Heng-Moss, T., Shearman, R., Baxendale, F., Sarath, G., Lee, D., Nabity, P. 2010. Characterization of Peroxidase Changes in Resistant and Susceptible Warm- Season Turfgrasses Challenged by Blissus Occiduus. Arthropod-Plant Interactions. Vol 4: 45-55

Interpretive Summary: Turfgrasses can be infested with insect pests such as chinchbugs. Insect herbivory can be best combated by using plant tolerance as a resistance mechanism. However, biochemical markers, such as enzymes, are needed to select tolerant plants. Results from this study suggests that peroxidases (a class of enzymes) have the potential to be used as markers for selecting chinch bug resistant turfgrasses, and may be a factor in how a plant defends itself against biotic stresses like chinch bug injury.

Technical Abstract: Peroxidases play an important role in plant stress related interactions. This research assessed the role of peroxidases in the defense response of resistant and susceptible buffalograsses [Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm] and zoysiagrasses (Zoysia japonica Steudel) to the western chinch bug, Blissus occiduus Barber. The objectives were: 1) to assess the relationships among protein content, basal peroxidase levels, chinch bug injury, and ploidy levels of chinch bug-resistant and -susceptible buffalograsses; 2) to compare peroxidase activity levels of resistant and susceptible buffalograsses/zoysiagrasses in response to chinch bug feeding; 3) and to analyze extracted proteins from chinch bug-resistant and –susceptible buffalograsses/zoysiagrasses by native gel electrophoresis to obtain information on the peroxidase profiles. Correlation analyses of 28 buffalograss genotypes with varying levels of chinch bug resistance and ploidy levels indicated that buffalograss total protein content and chinch bug injury was correlated (r = 0.47, P = 0.01), while basal peroxidase levels and chinch bug injury was not (r = 0.19, P = 0.29), suggesting the up-regulation of peroxidases in resistant buffalograsses is a direct response to chinch bug feeding. Three of the four chinch bug-resistant buffalograss genotypes evaluated had higher peroxidase activity in infested plants when compared to control plants. Peroxidase activity levels were similar between infested and control plants of the two highly susceptible buffalograss genotypes. Zoysiagrasses had lower peroxidase activity in general when compared to buffalograss control plants and only ‘Zorro’ consistently showed higher peroxidase activity in infested plants. Native gel electrophoresis analysis identified differences in the isozyme profiles of infested and control buffalograsses ‘Prestige’ and 196 and the zoysiagrass ‘Zorro’. Results from this study suggests that peroxidases have the potential to be used as markers for selecting chinch bug resistant turfgrasses, and may be a factor in how a plant defends itself against biotic stresses like chinch bug injury.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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