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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: APPLICATION OF BIOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR TECHNIQUES TO THE DIAGNOSIS AND CONTROL OF AVIAN INFLUENZA AND OTHER EMERGING POULTRY PATHOGENS Title: Research update from Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory

Authors
item Suarez, David
item Swayne, David
item Pantin-Jackwood, Mary
item Afonso, Claudio
item Miller, Patti
item Kapczynski, Darrell

Submitted to: United States Animal Health Association Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 15, 2009
Publication Date: April 1, 2010
Citation: Suarez, D.L., Swayne, D.E., Pantin Jackwood, M.J., Afonso, C.L., Miller, P.J., Kapczynski, D.R. 2010. Research update from Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory [abstract]. Report of the 113th United States Animal Health Association meeting, October 13, 2009, San Diego, California. p. 26-27.

Technical Abstract: The Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory does intramural research for the United States Department of Agriculture on avian Influenza and Newcastle disease viruses. Research accomplishments for the last year will be reported. This includes the development of new real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) diagnostic tests for novel H1N1 for the veterinary field, including both poultry and swine. In addition the novel H1N1 was evaluated for the potential to infect four poultry species, and it was found that they could subclinically infect quail but not chickens, ducks or turkeys. Research on vaccine efficacy was also performed in chickens and quail using recent H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza isolates from Egypt and Vietnam. The commonly used killed commercially available influenza vaccines did not provide complete protection from some of the variant viruses tested. Influenza virus transmission was also evaluated, and virus could be detected in airborne droplets during simulated slaughter. In contact chicken controls were infected. A simple method of reducing virus shed with plastic bags was proposed to reduce human exposure. Continued studies on genetic resistance in different species was also evaluated.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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