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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: RESEARCH, ACQUISITION, MANAGEMENT, AND DOCUMENTATION OF PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES

Location: Plant Germplasm Introduction and Testing

Title: Mapping genetic variation and seed zones for Bromus carinatus in the Blue Mountains of eastern Oregon, USA.

Authors
item JOHNSON, RICHARD
item Erickson, Vicky -
item Mandel, Nancy -
item St Clair, J -
item Vance-Borland, Kenneth -

Submitted to: Botany
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 25, 2010
Publication Date: July 27, 2010
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/45863
Citation: Johnson, R.C., Erickson, V.J., Mandel, N.L., St Clair, J.B., Vance-Borland, K.W. 2010. Mapping genetic variation and seed zones for Bromus carinatus in the Blue Mountains of eastern Oregon, USA.. Botany 88: 725-736

Interpretive Summary: Revegetation after fire and other disturbances is essential for restoring wildlife habitat, recreation, and grazing resources. Mountain Brome is a key native grass with rapid establishment and deep, wide-spreading roots, making it well-suited for revegetation of disturbed sites. In this study, germplasm was collected from a wide range of environments in the Blue Mountains of Northeastern Oregon and South Eastern Washington and evaluated in common gardens to develop seed movement guidelines. Plant traits associated with leaf length, leaf pubescence, head abundance, plant height, crown diameter and dry weight were most commonly correlated with elevation, maximum temperature, and precipitation at seed source environments. When precipitation and elevation were lower, and temperature higher, the trend was toward higher dry matter production, longer leaves, wider crowns and greater plant height. Regression models were used with GIS to map proposed seed transfer zones across Blue Mountains. The results showed that precipitation, maximum temperature, and elevation were key factors in Mt. Brome adaption and that maps of seed transfer zones will be useful for guiding germplasm sources for revegetation of Mt. Brome in the Blue Mountains.

Technical Abstract: Genecology studies using regression models to develop plant adaptation zones are useful to ensure that germplasm selected for revegetation is environmentally adapted. In this study, genecology studies were completed on Mt. Brome (Bromus carinatus Hook. & Arn ) using 148 populations collected in the Blue Mountains of southeast Washington and northeast Oregon. The objective was to determine and map patterns of adaptive genetic variation for Mt. Brome across the Blue Mountains. Common gardens were established at Pullman and Central Ferry WA in fall 2003 and data on phenology, morphology, and production collected in 2004 and 2005. Plant traits associated with leaf length, leaf pubescence, head abundance, plant height, crown diameter and dry weight were most commonly correlated with environmental variables at seed source locations (P<0.05). Correlations of plant traits with temperature and frost free days were predominantly positive, and all correlations with precipitation and elevation were negative. Correlations of dry weight with precipitation (r=-0.27), elevation (r=-0.34), and average maximum temperature (r=0.32) were all significant (P<0.01, n=193). When precipitation and elevation were lower, and temperature higher, the trend was toward higher dry matter production, longer leaves, wider crowns and greater plant height. The same results were observed in correlations with the generalized plant traits principal component (PC) 1 and PC 2. Regression models of environmental variables with PC 1 and PC 2 were found that explained 46% and 40% of the total variation, respectively. Regression models were used with GIS to map proposed seed transfer zones across Blue Mountains. The results showed that annual precipitation, maximum temperature, and elevation were key factors in Mt. Brome regression modeling and adaption; maps of seed transfer zones will be useful for guiding germplasm sources for revegetation of Mt. Brome in the Blue Mountains.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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