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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: HYDROLOGIC PROCESSES, SCALE, CLIMATE VARIABILITY, AND WATER RESOURCES FOR SEMIARID WATERSHED MANAGEMENT

Location: Southwest Watershed Research

Title: Using Sap Flow Monitoring for Improved Process-based Ecohydrologic Understanding 2022

Author
item Scott, Russell

Submitted to: American Geophysical Union
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 2008
Publication Date: October 1, 2008
Citation: Scott, R.L. 2008. Using Sap Flow Monitoring for Improved Process-based Ecohydrologic Understanding. [abstract]. Eos Trans. AGU, 89(53), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract B43C-0449.

Interpretive Summary: Sap flow measurements can be an important tool for unraveling the complex web of ecosystem fluxes, especially when it is combined with other measurements like eddy covariance, isotopes, remote sensing, etc. In this talk, we will demonstrate how sap flow measurements have improved our process-level understanding of fluxes in semiarid regions by reviewing results from several experiments that were carried out in variety of ecosystems in the Southwest U.S. The examples include: quantifying the transpiration of linear riparian forests, partitioning of evapotranspiration in desert shrublands, and determining the ecohydrologic significance of hydraulic redistribution of mesquite trees in riparian and upland woodlands. We will also discuss methods to scale up branch- or plant-level measurements to ecosystem scale.

Technical Abstract: Sap flow measurements can be an important tool for unraveling the complex web of ecosystem fluxes, especially when it is combined with other measurements like eddy covariance, isotopes, remote sensing, etc. In this talk, we will demonstrate how sap flow measurements have improved our process-level understanding of fluxes in semiarid regions by reviewing results from several experiments that were carried out in variety of ecosystems in the Southwest U.S. The examples include: quantifying the transpiration of linear riparian forests, partitioning of evapotranspiration in desert shrublands, and determining the ecohydrologic significance of hydraulic redistribution of mesquite trees in riparian and upland woodlands. We will also discuss methods to scale up branch- or plant-level measurements to ecosystem scale.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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