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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: NEW APPROACHES FOR INSECT PEST MANAGEMENT IN VEGETABLE CROPS

Location: Vegetable Research

Title: ‘Charleston Scarlet’ Sweetpotato

Authors
item Jackson, David
item Bohac, Janice
item Thies, Judy
item Harrison, Howard

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 16, 2009
Publication Date: February 7, 2010
Repository URL: http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/cgi/reprint/45/2/306
Citation: Jackson, D.M., Bohac, J., Thies, J.A., Harrison Jr, H.F. 2010. ‘Charleston Scarlet’ Sweetpotato. HortScience. 45:306-309.

Interpretive Summary: Soil-borne insects and nematodes are major pests of commercial sweetpotatoes in the United States. The development and use of resistant sweetpotato cultivars is an ideal method for controlling these pests. The sweetpotato cultivar ‘Charleston Scarlet’ was developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Charleston, SC. ‘Charleston Scarlet’ produces orange-fleshed, sweet storage roots with attractive scarlet-colored skin. It is highly resistant to insects and nematodes. ‘Charleston Scarlet’ flowers and produces seeds profusely, and would make an excellent parent for sweetpotato breeding programs. Its high level of insect and nematode resistance may be very beneficial for organic farmers and home gardeners who typically do not use chemical pesticides.

Technical Abstract: The sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] cultivar, ‘Charleston Scarlet’ was developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Charleston, SC. ‘Charleston Scarlet’ produces orange-fleshed, sweet storage roots with attractive scarlet-colored skin (periderm). Vine growth is vigorous with large chordate leaves that form a dense canopy. ‘Charleston Scarlet’ is highly resistant to insects and nematodes and moderately resistant to Fusarium wilt. Storage roots store well and have an excellent baking quality with a moist, sweet flesh. Bedded ‘Charleston Scarlet’ seed roots produce a large number of uniform sprouts that transplant well. This cultivar flowers and produces seeds profusely, and makes an excellent polycross parent for the development of red-skinned, sweet, orange-fleshed cultivars with multiple resistance traits and excellent cooking characteristics. Its high level of insect and nematode resistance may be very beneficial for organic farmers and home gardeners who typically do not use pesticides.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014