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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Feasibility of dibromochloropropane (DBCP) and trichloroethylene (TCE) adsorption onto activated carbons made from nut shells of different almond varieties

Authors
item Klasson, K Thomas
item Ledbetter, Craig
item Wartelle, Lynda
item Lingle, Sarah

Submitted to: Industrial Crops and Products
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 4, 2009
Publication Date: February 1, 2010
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/41353
Citation: Klasson, K.T., Ledbetter, C.A., Wartelle, L.H., Lingle, S.E. 2010. Feasibility of dibromochloropropane (DBCP) and trichloroethylene (TCE) adsorption onto activated carbons made from nut shells of different almond varieties. Industrial Crops and Products. 31:261-265.

Interpretive Summary: Steam-activated carbons were made from shells from five different almond types and from a mix of types. The purpose of the work was to evaluate if the composition of shells had any effect on the performance of the final product. The shells contained the same level of cellulose, but differed in their lignin and hemicellulose composition. The yield of carbon from the shells ranged from 20-23.5%, indicating a loss of about 80% of initial mass. Regardless of the composition, the performance of the activated carbons made from the shells was very similar. The carbons were found to have a capacity of 100 to 105 mg/g of carbon for the two contaminants tested (dibromochloropropane and trichloroethylene). The finding that the activated carbons performed equally well, regardless of source of almond shells, suggest that that carbons could be made from almonds shells with consistent quality.

Technical Abstract: Steam-activated carbons were made from shells from five different almond varieties (‘Nonpareil,’ ‘Padre,’ Tuono,’ ‘23-122,’ and ‘Y120-74’) and from a mix of almond types. The purpose of the work was to evaluate if the composition of shells had any effect on the performance of the final product. The shells contained the same level of cellulose, but differed in their lignin and hemicellulose composition. The yield of carbon from the shells ranged from 20-23.5%, indicating a loss of about 80% of initial mass. Regardless of the composition, the performance of the activated carbons made from the shells was very similar. The carbons were found to have a capacity of 100 to 105 mg/g of carbon for the two contaminants tested (dibromochloropropane and trichloroethylene). The finding that the activated carbons performed equally well, regardless of source of almond shells, suggest that that carbons could be made from almonds shells with consistent quality.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014