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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ECOLOGY, SAMPLING, AND MODELING OF INSECT PESTS OF STORED GRAIN, PROCESSING FACILITIES, AND WAREHOUSES

Location: Stored Product Insect Research Unit

Title: Influence of Commodity Type, Percentage of Cracked Kernels, and Wheat Class on Population Growth of Stored-Product Psocids (Psocoptera: Liposcelidae)

Authors
item Athanassiou, Christos -
item Opit, George -
item Throne, James

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 23, 2009
Publication Date: June 1, 2010
Citation: Athanassiou, C.G., Opit, G.P., Throne, J.E. 2010. Influence of Commodity Type, Percentage of Cracked Kernels, and Wheat Class on Population Growth of Stored-Product Psocids (Psocoptera: Liposcelidae). Journal of Economic Entomology. 103: 985-990. DOI: 10.1603/EC09280.

Interpretive Summary: Psocids, or booklice, are emerging pests of stored grains, and little is known about them. Population growth of four psocid species, Liposcelis bostrychophila, L. decolor, L. paeta, and L. entomophila was greatest on sorghum, followed by wheat and rice. Progeny production on wheat containing varying amounts of cracked kernels did not increase as cracked kernel content increased; instead, progeny production peaked at 20% cracked kernels for L. bostrychophila adults and nymphs, at 10% for L. decolor, and at 50% for L. paeta adults. No further increases were noted beyond these levels of cracked wheat content. Progeny production on eight classes of wheat was highest on durum wheat. The results indicate that there are considerable variations in psocid population growth among the different commodities tested, and this information may be used to predict the degree to which stored commodities are susceptible to psocid infestation.

Technical Abstract: The effect of the type of grain commodity on population growth of four psocid species, Liposcelis bostrychophila Badonnel, L. decolor (Pearman), L. paeta Pearman, and L. entomophila (Enderlein) (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae), was examined under laboratory conditions. Sorghum was the most suitable for all species, followed by wheat and rice, while progeny production was negligible on wheat germ. In a second experiment which did not include L. entomophila, population growth was examined on wheat containing 0, 1, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100% cracked kernels. Progeny production did not increase as cracked kernel content increased. Instead, progeny production peaked at 20% cracked kernels for L. bostrychophila adults and nymphs, at 10% for L. decolor, and at 50% for L. paeta adults; no further increases were noted beyond these levels of cracked wheat content. In a third experiment which did not include L. entomophila, progeny production was examined on eight classes of wheat: hard red winter, hard red spring, soft white winter, soft white spring, soft club, durum, soft red winter, and hard white. Overall, progeny production was higher on durum wheat than on the other classes. The results indicate that there are considerable variations in psocid population growth among the different commodities tested, and this information may be used to predict the degree to which stored commodities are susceptible to psocid infestation.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014
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