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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOCONTROL OF FUMONISIN AND OTHER MYCOTOXINS IN CORN AND TALL FESCUE WITH MICROBIAL ENDOPHYTES

Location: Toxicology and Mycotoxin Research

Title: Colonization of maize seedlings under drought conditions by two ochratoxin A producers species within the A. section Nigri

Authors
item Palencia, Edwin -
item Glenn, Anthony
item Bacon, Charles

Submitted to: Phytopathology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: June 1, 2009
Publication Date: August 1, 2009
Citation: Palencia, E.R., Glenn, A.E., Bacon, C.W. 2009. Colonization of maize seedlings under drought conditions by two ochratoxin A producers species within the A. section Nigri. Phytopathology. August 1 - 5, 2009. Portland, OR.

Interpretive Summary: Abstract - no summary required

Technical Abstract: Some species of black-spored aspergilli (Aspergillus section Nigri) are able to cause disease in several plant hosts, including peanut and maize seedlings. Besides the economical impact of black-spored aspergilli infections, several species within this section are well known mycotoxin producers, specifically the teratogenic, nephrotoxic, and potential carcinogenic ochratoxin A. The interactions between maize and A. section Nigri species are poorly understood, especially since endophytic colonizations are symptomless. In this study, A. carbonarius and A. foetidus were transformed with green, yellow, and red fluorescent proteins, and used to measure colonization of maize seedlings under drought stress conditions. Maize kernels were infected with 5 × 104 spore/ml suspension. After 3 weeks of inoculation, seedlings were drought stressed, and the colonization of lateral roots, meristem, and stems was monitored at different time points with the aid of laser scanning confocal microscopy. The use of a fluorescent tagging approach determined the different colonization patterns employed by black spored aspergilli species during maize seedling colonization.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014