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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY BASED CEREAL APHID MANAGMENT Title: Global phylogenetics of Diuraphis noxia (Hemiptera: Aphididae), an invasive aphid species: Evidence for multiple invasions into North America

Authors
item Liu, Xiang -
item Marshall, Jeremy -
item Stary, Petr -
item Edwards, Owain -
item Puterka, Gary
item Dolatti, L -
item El Bouhssini, Mustapha -
item Malinga, Joyce -
item Lage, Jacob -
item Smith, C -

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 23, 2010
Publication Date: June 1, 2010
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/43299
Citation: Liu, X., Marshall, J.L., Stary, P., Edwards, O., Puterka, G.J., Dolatti, L., El Bouhssini, M., Malinga, J., Lage, J., Smith, C.M. 2010. Global phylogenetics of Diuraphis noxia (Hemiptera: Aphididae), an invasive aphid species: Evidence for multiple invasions into North America. Journal of Economic Entomology. 103(3):958-965.

Interpretive Summary: The Russian wheat aphid (RWA) invaded the United States in 1986 and has since diversified into eight biotypes, defined based on their ability to damage different wheat and barley varieties. Our objective was to determine if the RWA biotypes resulted from a single invasion or multiple invasions into North America. We utilized the genetic technique of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), in combination with collections of RWA from around the World, estimate genetic divergence. Our data suggests that there were at least two invasions of different origin into North America, each resulting in subsequent diversification into multiple biotypes. This data indicates that the United States wheat production will continue to be threatened by new introductions of this already important pest.

Technical Abstract: Critical to the study of an invasive species is understanding the number and origin of invasions that have occurred, as well as the rate or potential of post-invasion adaptation and geographic range expansion. One virulent, invasive insect species that has caused much damage in the United States is the Russian wheat aphid (RWA), Diuraphis noxia (Kurdjumov). Past research on D. noxia has suggested that up to eight biotypes, defined based on their ability to damage different wheat and barley genotypes now occur in the western United States. Our objective was to determine if the RWA biotypes resulted from a single invasion or multiple invasions into North America. We utilized the genome-wide technique of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), in combination with collections of D. noxia from around the World, estimate genetic divergence. Our data suggests that there were at least two invasions of different origin into North America, each resulting in subsequent post-invasion diversification that has since yielded multiple biotypes. This data indicates that the United States wheat production will continue to be threatened by new introductions of this already important pest.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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