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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MANAGEMENT OF NEMATODES AND VIRUS DISEASES AFFECTING POTATO AND GRAIN CROPS Title: Molecular characterization and functional analysis of ubiquitin extension genes from the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis

Authors
item Chronis, Demosthenis -
item Yu, Hang -
item Lu, Shun-Wen -
item Wang, Xiaohong

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 3, 2009
Publication Date: July 19, 2009
Citation: Chronis, D., Yu, H., Lu, S., Wang, X. 2009. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of ubiquitin extension genes from the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis. Meeting Abstract. p. 41.

Technical Abstract: Ubiquitin is a highly conserved 76-amino acid protein found in every eukaryotic cell. It has been proposed that ubiquitin has many cellular functions including DNA repair, transcription regulation, regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis. We identified two ubiquitin extension genes (Gr-Ubi1 and Gr-Ubi2) from the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis that encode proteins containing a monoubiquitin domain and a signal peptide enabling secretion. Southern blot analysis showed that multiple copies of the Gr-Ubi gene exist in the nematode genome and RT-PCR analysis revealed strong expression of the gene throughout the nematode life cycle. In situ mRNA hybridization localized the Gr-Ubi gene expression exclusively within the dorsal esophageal gland cell of both preparasitic and parasitic stages of the nematode, suggesting a possible secretion of these ubiquitin extension proteins during nematode parasitism. C-terminal GFP translational fusions were used to determine the subcellular localization of the ubiquitin extension protein in planta. Our preliminary results indicated that the protein is localized on the cell membrane and in the nucleus of infiltrated tobacco leaf cells. Potato transgenic RNAi and overexpressing lines for the Gr-Ubi gene are currently being developed to further investigate the role of these nematode-produced proteins in plant parasitism.

Last Modified: 11/22/2014
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