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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVED PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES FOR PASTURES AND RANGELANDS IN THE TEMPERATE SEMIARID REGIONS OF THE WESTERN U.S.

Location: Forage and Range Research

Title: Species Selection and Grazing Management Guidelines

Authors
item Ogle, Daniel -
item St. John, Loren -
item Jensen, Kevin

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: February 15, 2010
Publication Date: May 10, 2010
Citation: Ogle, D.G., St. John, L., Jensen, K.B. 2010. Species Selection and Grazing Management Guidelines. p. 7-20. In G.E. Shewmaker and M.G. Bohle (eds.) Pasture and Grazing Management in the Northwest, PNW 614, University of Idaho Extension, Moscow. Book Chapter.

Interpretive Summary: These guidelines were prepared to help land managers/users select appropriate seed mixtures for revegetation on irrigated and dryland pastures in the Northwestern region of the United States. Recommending a seed mixture is complicated because of the various ecosystems, land uses, soils, and plant selection goals. We wanted to keep the use of the guidelines as simple as possible but still be able to recommend adaptable seed mixtures. This chapter describes the different species appropriate for irrigated and dryland plantings and includes a species description of recomended species.

Technical Abstract: This guide provides recommendations on plant materials for Irrigated and Dryland pastures in the Northwestern region of the United States. This guide walks land users through the proper steps in selecting the proper plant materials for planting by asking the following questions 1) what are my management goals; 2) do I have a reasonable understanding of soil and species management; 3) are enough desirable plants (species) still present on the proposed seeding site to promote recovery without planting if proper management is applied; 4) how risky is a new seeding; 5) what impact will disturbance of soils and plant life have on the biological health of the area; and 6) will the expected increase in forage offset the possibility of weed invasion, particularly on dryland pastures, or loss of stable soils and sensitive native plant communities? By answering these questions, land users will be able to identify appropriate plant materials to match their objectives.

Last Modified: 4/16/2014
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