Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT OF INTEGRATED SYSTEMS FOR SUBTROPICAL/TROPICAL FRUIT CROP PRODUCTION

Location: Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research

Title: Temporal and spatial variation in infestation of fruit by Anastrepha spp. in Puerto Rico: Support for a fruit fly-free zone

Authors
item Jenkins, David
item Goenaga, Ricardo

Submitted to: Florida Entomological Society Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: May 30, 2009
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Cultivators of fruit on the island of Puerto Rico face substantial barriers to the exportation of their fruit due to the presence of two species of fruit flies, Anastrepha obliqua and A. suspensa. There are regions of the world that will not import any fruit from regions containing these fruit flies and other regions require expensive and potentially damaging post-harvest treatment of the fruit to ensure that it is not infested. If a fruit fly-free zone could be established and maintained on a part of the island Puerto Rican growers would benefit from an enlarged market and the consuming public would have access to fresh exotic fruit that would provide a healthy alternative to processed carbohydrates. Anecdotal evidence has led us to believe that the southern portion of the island supports much lower populations of both Anastrepha obliqua and A. suspensa. We present data supporting this fact, including host densities for different parts of the island, infestation rates of different fruits on different parts of the island, and population fluctuations on different parts of the island.

Technical Abstract: If Puerto Rico could establish and maintain a fruit fly-free zone in a portion of the island, growers could then export that fruit without expensive post-harvest measures, as well as dramatically increase the locations where they could export this fruit. Key in establishing a fruit fly-free zone is developing an understanding of the fruit fly’s life history, including longevity, how far they can move, and the effect of host density on population fluctuations. Anecdotal evidence has led us to believe that the southern portion of the island supports much lower populations of both Anastrepha obliqua and A. suspensa. We present data supporting this fact, including host densities for different parts of the island, infestation rates of different fruits on different parts of the island, and population fluctuations on different parts of the island.

Last Modified: 10/31/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page