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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVING SOIL AND NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR SUSTAINED PRODUCTIVITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Title: Pyrosequencing reveals a highly diverse and cultivar-specific bacterial endophyte community in plant roots

Authors
item Manter, Daniel
item Delgado, Jorge
item Holm, D -
item Stong, Rachel

Submitted to: Microbial Ecology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 12, 2010
Publication Date: April 23, 2010
Citation: Manter, D.K., Delgado, J.A., Holm, D., Stong, R.A. 2010. Pyrosequencing reveals a highly diverse and cultivar-specific bacterial endophyte community in plant roots. Microbial Ecology. 60:157-166.

Interpretive Summary: This is the first known pyrosequencing assessment of plant-endophyes residing within roots. The assessment suggests that the microbial assemblage residing within plant tissues is cultivar-specific and its phylotype richness is several orders of magnitude greater than previously believed. This new pyrosequencing method application can serve to reveal bacterial diversity in plant roots not detectable by other methods, which could bring a number of unanticipated benefits, ranging from more accurate microflora diversity assessment and quantification, to supporting further studies that examine the contribution of microflora on plant physiology, production, soil health, and environmental conservation.

Technical Abstract: This is the first known pyrosequencing assessment of plant-endophyes residing within roots. The assessment suggests that the microbial assemblage residing within plant tissues is cultivar-specific and its phylotype richness is several orders of magnitude greater than previously believed. This new pyrosequencing method application can serve to reveal bacterial diversity in plant roots not detectable by other methods, which could bring a number of unanticipated benefits, ranging from more accurate microflora diversity assessment and quantification, to supporting further studies that examine the contribution of microflora on plant physiology, production, soil health, and environmental conservation.

Last Modified: 12/25/2014