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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND MANURE MANAGEMENT FOR REDUCTION OF HEALTH-RELATED MICROORGANISMS AND ODOR Title: Nutrient and Bacterial Transport in Runoff from Soil and Pond Ash Amended Feedlot Surfaces

Authors
item Gilley, John
item Berry, Elaine
item Eigenberg, Roger
item Marx, David -
item Woodbury, Bryan

Submitted to: Transactions of the ASABE
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 1, 2009
Publication Date: November 1, 2009
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/38157
Citation: Gilley, J.E., Berry, E.D., Eigenberg, R.A., Marx, D.B., Woodbury, B.L. 2009. Nutrient and Bacterial Transport in Runoff from Soil and Pond Ash Amended Feedlot Surfaces. Transactions of the ASABE. 52(6):2077-2085.

Interpretive Summary: The use of pond ash (fly ash that has been placed in evaporative ponds for storage and subsequently dewatered) for feedlot surfaces provides environmental and economic benefits. However, the water quality effects of pond ash use are not well defined. The objectives of this field investigation were to: a) compare feedlot soil properties, and nutrient and bacterial transport in runoff from soil and pond ash feedlot surfaces, b) compare the effects of unconsolidated surface materials (USM) (loose manure pack) and consolidated subsurface materials (CSM) (compacted manure and underlying layers) on runoff nutrient and bacterial transport, and c) determine if runoff nutrient and bacterial transport are correlated to feedlot soil properties. Simulated rainfall events were applied to experimental plots located within feedlot pens. Soil measurements of calcium, magnesium, and pH were significantly greater on the pond ash than the soil surfaces. The feedlot surfaces contained significantly greater amounts of phosphorus and sulfur than the pond ash surfaces. The runoff load of ammonia was significantly greater on the surfaces containing pond ash, while the phosphorus load was significantly greater on the soil surfaces. The nitrogen loads in runoff were significantly greater on the surfaces with CSM. The phosphorus load of runoff was significantly correlated to soil phosphorus measurements. Thus, it may be possible to predict runoff phosphorus load from soil phosphorus measurements.

Technical Abstract: The use of pond ash (fly ash that has been placed in evaporative ponds for storage and subsequently dewatered) for feedlot surfaces provides environmental and economic benefits. However, the water quality effects of pond ash use are not well defined. The objectives of this field investigation were to: a) compare feedlot soil properties, and nutrient and bacterial transport in runoff from soil and pond ash feedlot surfaces, b) compare the effects of unconsolidated surface materials (USM) (loose manure pack) and consolidated subsurface materials (CSM) (compacted manure and underlying layers) on runoff nutrient and bacterial transport, and c) determine if runoff nutrient and bacterial transport are correlated to feedlot soil properties. Simulated rainfall events were applied to 0.75-m wide by 2-m long plots. Soil measurements of calcium, magnesium, and pH were significantly greater on the pond ash than the soil surfaces. The feedlot surfaces contained significantly greater amounts of Bray 1-P and sulfur than the pond ash surfaces. The runoff load of NH4-N was significantly greater on the surfaces containing pond ash, while the total phosphorus (TP) load was significantly greater on the soil surfaces. The NO3-N and total nitrogen (TN) loads in runoff were significantly greater on the surfaces with CSM. Concentrations of Escherichia coli in runoff were similar on the pond ash and soil surfaces. The dissolved phosphorus (DP), particulate phosphorus (PP), and TP load of runoff were all significantly correlated to Bray 1-P measurements. Thus, it may be possible to predict runoff phosphorus load from soil P measurements.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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