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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: OBJECT MODELING AND SCALING OF LANDSCAPE PROCESSES AND CONSERVATION EFFECTS IN AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS Title: A Component-Based Distributed Watershed Model for the USDA CEAP Watershed Assessment Study

Authors
item Ascough, James
item David, Olaf -
item Krause, Peter -
item Green, Timothy
item Heathman, Gary
item Kralisch, Sven -
item Ahuja, Lajpat

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: June 23, 2009
Publication Date: August 27, 2009
Repository URL: http://www.iemss.org/farmsys09/uploads/2009_FSD_Proceedings.pdf
Citation: Ascough II, J.C., David, O., Krause, P., Green, T.R., Heathman, G.C., Kralisch, S., Ahuja, L.R. 2009. A Component-Based Distributed Watershed Model for the USDA CEAP Watershed Assessment Study. Meeting Abstract. p.19-20.

Interpretive Summary: Challenges in agro-ecosystem conservation management have created demand for state-of-the-art, integrated, and flexible modeling tools. For example, Objective 5 of the USDA CEAP Watershed Assessment Study (WAS) is to “develop and verify regional watershed models that quantify environmental outcomes of conservation practices in major agricultural regions.” In addition, numerous environmental modeling frameworks are currently under development with the chief purpose of integrating science process components into collaborative and customizable modeling systems. This study reports on: 1) integration of the J2K-S model (an object-oriented, modular system for distributed hydrologic and nitrogen dynamics modeling at the watershed scale) under the Object Modeling System (OMS) environmental modeling framework; and 2) evaluation of OMS J2K-S performance on the CEAP benchmark Cedar Creek Watershed (CCW) in northeastern Indiana. Initial results comparing daily, average monthly, and annual average simulated and observed stream flows for the 1997-2005 simulation period resulted in coefficients ranging from 15-22% for relative error, 2.0-8.3 m3 s-1 for RMSE, and 0.49-0.58 for Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency. Preliminary results using a Shuffled Complex Evolution calibration algorithm show higher Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency and lower relative error (0.53-0.64 and 12-18%, respectively). The prototype OMS-J2K watershed model was able to reproduce the general hydrological dynamics of the CCW, and should serve as a foundation upon which to build a more comprehensive regionalized model in order to better assess water quantity and quality at the watershed scale.

Technical Abstract: Challenges in agro-ecosystem conservation management have created demand for state-of-the-art, integrated, and flexible modeling tools. For example, Objective 5 of the USDA CEAP Watershed Assessment Study (WAS) is to “develop and verify regional watershed models that quantify environmental outcomes of conservation practices in major agricultural regions.” In addition, numerous environmental modeling frameworks are currently under development with the chief purpose of integrating science process components into collaborative and customizable modeling systems. This study reports on: 1) integration of the J2K-S model (an object-oriented, modular system for distributed hydrologic and nitrogen dynamics modeling at the watershed scale) under the Object Modeling System (OMS) environmental modeling framework; and 2) evaluation of OMS J2K-S performance on the CEAP benchmark Cedar Creek Watershed (CCW) in northeastern Indiana. Initial results comparing daily, average monthly, and annual average simulated and observed stream flows for the 1997-2005 simulation period resulted in coefficients ranging from 15-22% for relative error, 2.0-8.3 m3 s-1 for RMSE, and 0.49-0.58 for Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency. Preliminary results using a Shuffled Complex Evolution calibration algorithm show higher Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency and lower relative error (0.53-0.64 and 12-18%, respectively). The prototype OMS-J2K watershed model was able to reproduce the general hydrological dynamics of the CCW, and should serve as a foundation upon which to build a more comprehensive regionalized model in order to better assess water quantity and quality at the watershed scale.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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