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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONSERVATION SYSTEMS RESEARCH FOR IMPROVING ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND PRODUCER PROFITABILITY

Location: National Soil Dynamics Laboratory

Title: Cover crop residue and organic mulches provide weed control during limited-input no-till collard production

Authors
item Mulvaney, Michael -
item PRICE, ANDREW
item Wood, C. Wesley -

Submitted to: Journal of Sustainable Agriculture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 17, 2010
Publication Date: March 30, 2011
Citation: Mulvaney, M.J., Price, A.J., Wood, C. 2011. Cover crop residue and organic mulches provide weed control during limited-input no-till collard production. Journal of Sustainable Agriculture. 35:312-328.

Interpretive Summary: Limited input producers may adopt no-till if sufficient weed suppression can be achieved. High-biomass producing cover crops used in conjunction with organic mulches may provide sufficient weed control in no-till vegetable production. Our objective was to quantify weed suppression from a summer cover crop and organic mulches under no-till collard production. Forage soybean residue did not suppress weeds, but mulches were generally effective. Weed populations shifted away from broadleaves and sedges, but reasonable grass control was not achieved until three years after conversion to no-till. Grass suppression was greater when mulches were applied after the first year. Collard yield was not affected by any cover crop or mulch treatment.

Technical Abstract: Limited input producers may adopt no-till if sufficient weed suppression can be achieved. High-biomass producing cover crops used in conjunction with organic mulches may provide sufficient weed control in no-till vegetable production. Our objective was to quantify weed suppression from a summer cover crop and organic mulches under no-till collard production. Forage soybean residue did not suppress weeds, but mulches were generally effective. Weed populations shifted away from broadleaves and sedges, but reasonable grass control was not achieved until three years after conversion to no-till. Grass suppression was greater when mulches were applied after the first year. Collard yield was not affected by any cover crop or mulch treatment.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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