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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: POSTHARVEST TREATMENT OF TROPICAL COMMODITIES FOR QUARANTINE SECURITY, QUALITY MAINTENANCE, AND VALUE ENHANCEMENT

Location: Tropical Crop and Commodity Protection Research

Title: Host Status of Blueberry to Invasive Tephritid Fruit Flies in Hawaii

Authors
item Follett, Peter
item Armstrong, John - ARS-RETIRED
item Zee, Francis

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 9, 2009
Publication Date: October 1, 2009
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/36430
Citation: Follett, P.A., Armstrong, J.W., Zee, F.T. 2009. Host Status of Blueberry to Invasive Tephritid Fruit Flies in Hawaii. Journal of Economic Entomology. 102(5):1859-1863.

Interpretive Summary: Southern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L., Fam. Ericaceae) is a new potentially high-value niche crop for Hawaii (Zee et al. 2006, Hummer et al. 2007). Hawaii-grown blueberries are ripe at times United States mainland berries are unavailable, and could be used to supply local markets or shipped to the U.S mainland to compete with Central and South America blueberries. Forced infestation studies were conducted to determine if Southern highbush blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) are hosts for four species of invasive tephritid fruit flies in Hawaii. B. dorsalis, C. capitata, and B. cucurbitae produced an average of 1.06, 0.60 and 0.09 pupae per g fruit weight and had 79.5, 85.0, and 22.0 % adult emergence, respectively. In total, 2,677 blueberries were exposed to 2,681 B. latifrons and held on sand, and no pupariation or adult emergence was observed. These data suggest blueberry is a good host for Bactrocera dorsalis and Ceratitis capitata, an adequate host for Bactrocera cucurbitae, and a nonhost for Bactrocera latifrons.

Technical Abstract: Forced infestation studies were conducted to determine if Northern or Southern highbush blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) are hosts for four species of invasive tephritid fruit flies in Hawaii. Fifty fruit were exposed to an equal number of gravid female flies of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (oriental fruit fly), Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Mediterranean fruit fly), or Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillet) (melon fly) in screen cages outdoors for 6 h, and then held on sand in the laboratory for two weeks for any fruit fly emergence. B. dorsalis, C. capitata, and B. cucurbitae produced an average of 1.06, 0.60 and 0.09 pupae per g fruit weight and had 79.5, 85.0, and 22.0 % adult emergence, respectively. Similarly, six blueberry cultivars were harvested weekly for 10 weeks, exposed to Bactrocera latifrons (Hendel) in cages, and held for pupal and adult emergence on either sand or diet. In total, 2,677 blueberries were exposed to 2,681 B. latifrons and held on sand, and no pupariation or adult emergence was observed. Small numbers of B. latifrons puparia and adults emerged from diet on all cultivars. Results from rearing on sand and diet indicate that blueberry is an acceptable oviposition host for B. latifrons, but not an adequate developmental host. Two preferred hosts of B. latifrons, cherry tomatoes and bell peppers, were force-infested similarly and produced an average of 0.12 and 0.74 puparia g of fruit, and had 79.8 and 56.6% adult emergence, respectively. These data suggest blueberry is a good host for Bactrocera dorsalis and Ceratitis capitata, an adequate host for Bactrocera cucurbitae, and a nonhost for Bactrocera latifrons.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014
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