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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY BASED WEED MANAGEMENT: FUNDAMENTAL RESEARCH ON DORMANCY AND THE GENETICS OF WEEDS Title: Bud dormancy in perennial plants: a mechanism for survival. In:Dormancy of Cells and Organisms

Authors
item Anderson, James
item Horvath, David
item Chao, Wun
item Foley, Michael

Submitted to: Current Genetics
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: January 18, 2010
Publication Date: August 10, 2010
Citation: Anderson, J.V., Horvath, D.P., Chao, W.S., Foley, M.E. (2010) Bud Dormancy in Perennial Plants: A Mechanism for Survival. In: Lubzens, E., Cerda, J. and Clark, M. (eds.), Dormancy and Resistance in Harsh Environments. Topics in Current Genetics 21, Chapter 5, Hohmann, S. (series ed.), Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg. pp 69-90. DOI:10.1007/978-3-642-12422-8_5.

Interpretive Summary: Many plants evolved the ability to reproduce asexually through vegetative buds as a survival mechanism. Identifying the genetic and physiological mechanisms regulating dormancy in these reproductive structures will allow manipulation of plant growth and development in both desirable and undesirable species. Model plants have been used to study the physiological effects that photoperiod and temperature impart on dormancy regulation in perennial buds. At the molecular level, models derived through analysis of the transcriptome have shed new light on multiple cellular pathways and physiological processes associated with dormancy transitions and, in some cases, have revealed overlap with pathways regulating flowering and cold-acclimation. In this chapter, we discuss proposed models based on advances to our understanding of physiological and molecular factors affecting dormancy regulation in vegetative buds of perennials.

Technical Abstract: Many plants evolved the ability to reproduce asexually through vegetative buds as a survival mechanism. Identifying the genetic and physiological mechanisms regulating dormancy in these reproductive structures will allow manipulation of plant growth and development in both desirable and undesirable species. Model plants have been used to study the physiological effects that photoperiod and temperature impart on dormancy regulation in perennial buds. At the molecular level, models derived through analysis of the transcriptome have shed new light on multiple cellular pathways and physiological processes associated with dormancy transitions and, in some cases, have revealed overlap with pathways regulating flowering and cold-acclimation. In this chapter, we discuss proposed models based on advances to our understanding of physiological and molecular factors affecting dormancy regulation in vegetative buds of perennials.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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