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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SOIL APPLICATION OF AGRICULTURAL WASTE TO IMPROVE CROP PRODUCTION SYSTEMS AND ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Title: Availability of Clean Chip Residual as a Growth Substrate in the Southeast United States

Authors
item Boyer, C - KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY
item Gallagher, T - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Gilliam, C - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Fain, G - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Torbert, Henry
item Sibley, J - AUBURN UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Southern Nursery Association Research Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 22, 2009
Publication Date: July 22, 2009
Citation: Boyer, C.R., Gallagher, T.V., Gilliam, C.H., Fain, G.B., Torbert III, H.A., Sibley, J.L. 2009. Availability of Clean Chip Residual as a Growth Substrate in the Southeast United States [abstract]. Southern Nursery Association Research Conference. 2009 CDROM.

Interpretive Summary: Residual chipping material (also called clean chip residual or CCR) has potential use as a growth substrate in the nursery industry. The objective of this study was to quantify the amount and type of CCR material available in the Southeast United States for possible horticultural use by surveying working chipping operations on pine plantations. This study demonstrates that there are adequate amounts of CCR to supply the needs of horticultural industries, and, while more study is needed to determine suitability of material from every chipping operation, CCR obtained from ‘traditional’ pine plantation thinning operations should perform well for production of many species.

Technical Abstract: Residual chipping material (also called clean chip residual or CCR) has potential use as a growth substrate in the nursery industry. The objective of this study was to quantify the amount and type of CCR material available in the Southeast United States for possible horticultural use by surveying working chipping operations on pine plantations. Fourteen operators in four states were contacted to evaluate on site status of residual material including composition (wood, needles, bark), equipment use, and destination of the material. Results indicate that more than 40% of CCR is left in the plantation and that many chipping operations are willing to supply it to the nursery industry. This study demonstrates that there are adequate amounts of CCR to supply the needs of horticultural industries, and, while more study is needed to determine suitability of material from every chipping operation, CCR obtained from ‘traditional’ pine plantation thinning operations should perform well for production of many species.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014