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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: RESEARCH, ACQUISITION, MANAGEMENT, AND DOCUMENTATION OF PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES Title: Sugar beet germplasm collection in the National Plant Germplasm System.

Authors
item Hu, Jinguo
item Hellier, Barbara

Submitted to: American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 15, 2008
Publication Date: February 23, 2009
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/33184
Citation: Hu, J., Hellier, B.C. 2009. Sugar beet germplasm collection in the National Plant Germplasm System. American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists.

Interpretive Summary: The National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) holds more than 500,000 accessions of crop plant and related species that are maintained, characterized, regenerated and distributed by four major Plant Introduction Stations and an additional 21 special clonal and seed germplasm repositories. The Western Regional Plant Introduction Station (WRPIS) is responsible for managing approximately 80,000 accessions including the collection of sugar beet and related species. As of February 17, 2009, there were 2,550 Beta accessions with 2,332 belonging to B. vulgaris (29), B. vulgaris subsp. vulgaris (1,731) and B. vulgaris subsp. maritima (571). The remaining 218 accessions belong to a dozen wild Beta species with the number of accessions in each varying from two to 48. The whole collection is maintained in seed form in Pullman, WA with 1,926 accessions that are backed-up at the National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation in Fort Collins, CO. The data associated with each accession are stored in the Germplasm Resource Information Network (GRIN) database which can be accessed worldwide through the Internet for browsing the data or ordering seed samples (http://www.ars-grin.gov/npgs/). The purposes for maintaining the collection include preserving viable seeds harboring genetic diversity of Beta species, collecting information on biological and agronomic characteristics and finally, supplying seed samples to the sugar beet research community for genetic improvement of the crop. During regeneration great emphasis is placed on retaining the genetic integrity of the original seed samples. Together with our collaborators, we have collected and entered into GRIN 28,903 descriptor and evaluation records. We have distributed 6,050 seed samples to requesters worldwide with 5,119 to addresses in USA and 931 outside the USA since 1996. WRPIS welcomes suggestions, support, and collaborative efforts to achieve our goal of maintaining a healthy and available sugar beet germplasm collection. We would also like to thank the BSFD and others for their on going support.

Technical Abstract: The National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) holds more than 500,000 accessions of crop plant and related species that are maintained, characterized, regenerated and distributed by four major Plant Introduction Stations and an additional 21 special clonal and seed germplasm repositories. The Western Regional Plant Introduction Station (WRPIS) is responsible for managing approximately 80,000 accessions including the collection of sugar beet and related species. As of February 17, 2009, there were 2,550 Beta accessions with 2,332 belonging to B. vulgaris (29), B. vulgaris subsp. vulgaris (1,731) and B. vulgaris subsp. maritima (571). The remaining 218 accessions belong to a dozen wild Beta species with the number of accessions in each varying from two to 48. The whole collection is maintained in seed form in Pullman, WA with 1,926 accessions that are backed-up at the National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation in Fort Collins, CO. The data associated with each accession are stored in the Germplasm Resource Information Network (GRIN) database which can be accessed worldwide through the Internet for browsing the data or ordering seed samples (http://www.ars-grin.gov/npgs/). The purposes for maintaining the collection include preserving viable seeds harboring genetic diversity of Beta species, collecting information on biological and agronomic characteristics and finally, supplying seed samples to the sugar beet research community for genetic improvement of the crop. During regeneration great emphasis is placed on retaining the genetic integrity of the original seed samples. Together with our collaborators, we have collected and entered into GRIN 28,903 descriptor and evaluation records. We have distributed 6,050 seed samples to requesters worldwide with 5,119 to addresses in USA and 931 outside the USA since 1996. WRPIS welcomes suggestions, support, and collaborative efforts to achieve our goal of maintaining a healthy and available sugar beet germplasm collection. We would also like to thank the BSFD and others for their on going support.efforts to achieve our goal of maintaining a healthy and available sugar beet germplasm collection. We would also like to thank the BSFD and others for their on going support.

Last Modified: 11/28/2014
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