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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVED PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES FOR PASTURES AND RANGELANDS IN THE TEMPERATE SEMIARID REGIONS OF THE WESTERN U.S. Title: Low-Maintenance Turfgrass Research at the USDA-ARS Forage and Range Research Laboratory in Logan, UT

Author
item Bushman, Shaun

Submitted to: Popular Publication
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: January 29, 2009
Publication Date: March 1, 2009
Citation: Bushman, B.S. 2009. Low-Maintenance Turfgrass Research at the USDA-ARS Forage and Range Research Laboratory in Logan, UT. Popular Publication, Turf News, March/April, 2009, pgs.32-36.

Interpretive Summary: The USDA-ARS Forage and Range Research Lab (FRRL) is located in Logan, UT, on the Utah State University campus. Although traditionally studying dryland grasses and legumes with an emphasis on forage production, low maintenance turfgrass research at the FRRL has been underway since the early 1990's. Dr. Kay Asay and others evaluated spreading-type wheatgrasses for turf quality, and released 'Roadcrest' crested wheatgrass in 1999. This initial focus toward low maintenance turfgrass development has continued, with research recently expanded to include Kentucky bluegrass and fescues. Currently, of the twelve scientists in the FRRL, six (myself, Joe Robins, Blair Waldron, Doug Johnson, Jack Staub, and Richard Wang) have research proejcts concerning at least one of the three turf species, and have formed an internal turfgrass working group. This article provides an overview of our research goals and accomplishments, proposes how our efforts might improve turfgrass production or management, and discusses how we interact with customers and stakeholders. The research goals and accomplishments will be separated into: 1) Roadcrest turf-type crested wheatgrass, 2) Kentucky bluegrass improvement, and 3) a search for new germplasm and endophytes.

Technical Abstract: The USDA-ARS Forage and Range Research Lab (FRRL) is located in Logan, UT, on the Utah State University campus. Although traditionally studying dryland grasses and legumes with an emphasis on forage production, low maintenance turfgrass research at the FRRL, has been underway since the early 1990's. Dr. Kay Asay and others evaluated spreading-type wheatgrasses for turf quality, and released 'Roadcrest' crested wheatgrass in 1999. This initial focus toward low maintenance turfgrass development has continued, with research recently expanded to include Kentucky bluegrass and fescues. Currently, of the twelve scientists in the FRRL, six (myself, Joe Robins, Blair Waldron, Doug Johnson, Jack Staub, and Richard Wang) have research projects concerning at least one of the three turf species, and have formed an internal turfgrass working group. This article provides an overview of our research goals and accomplishments, proposes how our efforts might improve turfgrass production or management, and discusses how we interact with customers and stakeholders. The research goals and accomplishments will be separated into: 1) Roadcrest turf-type crested wheatgrass, 2)Kentiucky bluegrass improvement, and 3) a search for new germplasm and endophytes.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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