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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Current substances for organic weed control in vegetables or what do we have in our organic weed control tool box?

Authors
item Webber, Charles
item Shrefler, James - OSU, LANE, OK
item Brandenberger, Lynn - OSU, STILLWATER, OK
item Johnson, Wiley
item Davis, Angela
item Taylor, Merritt - OSU, LANE, OK
item Boydston, Rick

Submitted to: Horticultural Industry Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: February 7, 2009
Publication Date: April 23, 2009
Citation: Webber III, C.L., Shrefler, J.W., Brandenberger, L.P., Johnson, W.C., Davis, A.R., Taylor, M.J., Boydston, R.A. 2009. Current substances for organic weed control in vegetables or what do we have in our organic weed control tool box? In: Horticultural Industries Show, January 16-17, 2009, Ft. Smith, Arkansas. p. 218-223.

Interpretive Summary: To successfully control weeds in an organic production system, it is essential to judicially consider all the weed control options available. The growing list of organically approved herbicides should be integrated into their existing weed control strategies that may include crop rotations, cover crops, planting systems, mulches, solarization, mechanical methods, and flaming. The purpose of this publication is to provide general overview of weed control options for organic crop production. Research has demonstrated that corn gluten meal can be effectively used for weed control with transplanted vegetables, and, if precisely applied to provide a corn gluten meal-free planting strip, for direct-seeded vegetables. Although corn gluten meal and mustard meal can provide effective early preemergence weed control of germinating weed seeds, supplemental weed control measures will be required to control escaped weeds, established perennial weeds, or weeds emerging in the mid- to late-growing season. Post-directed applications of non-selective contact organic herbicides are showing promise. The height and plant maturity differences between the crop and target weeds are important factors in controlling weeds and protecting the crop from herbicide damage. The post-directed technique is especially effective when used in combination with either preemergence corn gluten meal applications or transplanted crops.

Technical Abstract: Weed control is the top research priority among organic producers. Organic producers have a short, but growing list of organic approved herbicides. The purpose of this publication is to provide general overview of weed control options for organic crop production. Research has demonstrated that corn gluten meal can be effectively used for weed control with transplanted vegetables, and, if precisely applied to provide a corn gluten meal-free planting strip, for direct-seeded vegetables. Although corn gluten meal and mustard meal can provide effective early preemergence weed control of germinating weed seeds, supplemental weed control measures will be required to control escaped weeds, established perennial weeds, or weeds emerging in the mid- to late-growing season. Post-directed applications of non-selective contact organic herbicides are showing promise. Height and plant maturity differences between the crop and target weeds are important factors in controlling weeds and protecting the crop from herbicide damage. The post-directed technique is especially effective when used in combination with either preemergence corn gluten meal applications or transplanted crops.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014