Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ECOLOGY, SAMPLING, AND MODELING OF INSECT PESTS OF STORED GRAIN, PROCESSING FACILITIES, AND WAREHOUSES

Location: Stored Product Insect Research Unit

Title: Efficacy of Grain Protectants Against Four Psocid Species on Maize, Rice, and Wheat

Authors
item Athanasiou, Christos
item Arthur, Franklin
item Throne, James

Submitted to: Pest Management Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 11, 2009
Publication Date: June 22, 2009
Repository URL: http://DOI 10.1002/ps.1804
Citation: Athanasiou, C.G., Arthur, F.H., Throne, J.E. 2009. Efficacy of Grain Protectants Against Four Psocid Species on Maize, Rice, and Wheat. Pest Management Science. 65: 1140-1146.

Interpretive Summary: Psocids, or booklice, are emerging pests in stored products, including stored grains. Currently, their control is based on the use of fumigants and contact insecticides; however, newer data indicate that psocids are tolerant to insecticides used to control other stored-grain insect pests. In this study, we evaluated the insecticides registered in the US for use on stored corn, rice, and wheat for control of the psocid species Lepinotus reticulatus, Liposcelis entomophila, L. bostrychophila, and L. paeta. On wheat and rice, chlorpyriphos-methyl + deltamethrin was generally more effective in controlling adults and reducing progeny production than spinosad or pyrethrum, while pirimiphos-methyl was more effective on corn than spinosad or pyrethrum. In most cases, progeny production was suppressed in all treated grains. Chlorpyriphos-methyl + deltamethrin and pirimiphos-methyl were the most effective insecticides for all species and commodities for which they are registered. Efficacy of spinosad or pyrethrum was dependent on the psocid species and commodity. This information will help grain storage managers select protectant insecticides for psocid control.

Technical Abstract: BACKGROUND: Psocids are emerging pests in stored products, particularly in amylaceous commodities, such as grains. Currently, their control is based on the use of fumigants and contact insecticides; however, newer data indicate that psocids are tolerant to insecticides used to control other stored-grain insect pests. In this study, we evaluated the insecticides registered in the USA for use on stored maize, rice, and wheat for control of the psocid species Lepinotus reticulatus, Liposcelis entomophila, L. bostrychophila, and L. paeta. Mortality of exposed adult females was recorded after 7 and 14 d of exposure while progeny production was assessed after 30 d of exposure. RESULTS: On wheat and rice, chlorpyriphos-methyl + deltamethrin was generally more effective against exposed parental adults than spinosad or pyrethrum, while pirimiphos-methyl was more effective on maize than spinosad or pyrethrum. In most cases, progeny production was suppressed in the treated grains. Progeny production was consistently lowest on wheat and rice treated with chlorpyriphos-methyl + deltamethrin and maize treated with pirimiphos-methyl. CONCLUSIONS: Chlorpyriphos-methyl + deltamethrin and pirimiphos-methyl were the most effective insecticides for all species and commodities. Conversely, efficacy of spinosad or pyrethrum was highly dependent on the psocid species and commodity.

Last Modified: 4/21/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page