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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENETIC IMPROVEMENT OF SOUTHERNPEAS AND PEPPERS

Location: Vegetable Research

Title: ZipperCream-CG and WhiteAcre-DG: Two Newly-released, Cream-type Southernpea Cultivars

Author
item Fery, Richard

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 12, 2009
Publication Date: August 1, 2009
Citation: Fery, R.L. 2009. ZipperCream-CG and WhiteAcre-DG: Two Newly-released, Cream-type Southernpea Cultivars. HortScience. 44(5):1511.

Technical Abstract: Efforts to incorporate genes conditioning a persistent green seed phenotype into Zipper Cream and White Acre type backgrounds were completed with the official release of the new southernpea cultivars ZipperCream-CG and WhiteAcre-DG on 29 January 2008. ZipperCream-CG is a high yielding, large-seeded, cream-type breeding line with a persistent green phenotype conditioned by the green cotyledon gene; it was developed using a backcross/pedigree breeding procedure that utilized Zipper Cream, Bettergreen, and Freezegreen as parental lines. The plant, pod, seed, and maturity characteristics of ZipperCream-CG are quite similar to those of Zipper Cream. WhiteAcre-DG is a high yielding, small-seeded, cream type breeding line with a persistent green seed phenotype conditioned by both the green cotyledon gene and green testa gene; it was developed using a relatively complex pedigree breeding procedure that utilized White Acre, Mississippi Silver, Freezegreen, and Bettergreen as parental lines. White Acre was utilized as a parent in four of the crosses. WhiteAcre-DG plants are similar in appearance to White Acre plants, but mature to the dry-pod harvest stage 4 to 9 days earlier. WhiteAcre-DG peas have an ovate to globose shape, similar to White Acre peas. The major attribute of both ZipperCream-CG and WhiteAcre-DG is their persistent green seed phenotype; both of these breeding lines can be harvested at the dry stage of maturity without loss of the pea’s fresh green color.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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