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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVING DAIRY FORAGE AND MANURE MANAGEMENT TO REDUCE ENVIRONMENTAL RISK Title: Effect of lactic acid-lactobacillus preservative and moisture concentration at baling on intake and digestibility of crabgrass hay by lambs and in-situ digestibility by heifers

Authors
item Hardin, L - UNIV. OF ARKANSAS
item Coffey, Kenneth - UNIV. OF ARKANSAS
item Killian, A - UNIV. OF ARKANSAS
item Caldwell, James - UNIV. OF ARKANSAS
item Philipp, Dirk - UNIV. OF ARKANSAS
item Coblentz, Wayne

Submitted to: Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Series
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: July 15, 2008
Publication Date: December 1, 2008
Repository URL: http://arkansasagnews.uark.edu/563-12.pdf
Citation: Hardin, L.A., Coffey, K.P., Killian, A.E., Caldwell, J.D., Philipp, D., Coblentz, W.K. 2008. Effect of lactic acid-lactobacillus preservative and moisture concentration at baling on intake and digestibility of crabgrass hay by lambs and in-situ digestibility by heifers. Arkansas Animal Science Department Report 2008. (11):43-45.

Technical Abstract: Crabgrass is a warm-season annual forage that has greater nutritive value than most other warm-season grasses and is highly palatable, but curing time for crabgrass hay is typically longer than for bermudagrass. Crabgrass hay was either not treated or treated with a lactic acid-lactobacillus preservative (LAL) and baled at 2 different moisture levels to determine effects on forage intake and digestion by lambs and in-situ digestibility by heifers. Twelve field plots of crabgrass were assigned randomly to 1 of 4 treatment combinations in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Half of the plots were sprayed with LAL at mowing and half were not sprayed (U). Within LAL and U, half of the plots were baled at 28% (M28) moisture and half at 18% moisture (M18). In Exp. 1, 16 wether lambs were offered 1 of the 4 treatment combinations ad libitum and total feces were collected for 5-d following a 7-d dietary adaptation period. Digestibility of DM was greater (P < 0.01) for M28 vs M18 and from LAL vs U. Digestible DM intake (% of BW) was greater (P < 0.05) from LAL vs. U. In Exp. 2, in situ ruminal degradation kinetics were determined using 6 ruminally-cannulated heifers. The water-soluble fraction was greater (P < 0.05) from M28-LAL and M18-U vs M28-U, and effective degradability was greater (P < 0.05) from M28-LAL than the other treatment combinations. The slowly degraded fraction was greater (P < 0.05) for M28 vs M18. Therefore, treating crabgrass with LAL improved DM digestion and digestible DM intake by lambs and increased ruminal DM digestibility of hay baled at greater moisture.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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