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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Antioxidant Effect of trans-Resveratrol, Pterostilbene, Quercetin and Their Combinations in Human Erythrocytes In Vitro

Authors
item Mikstacka, Renata - POZNAN UNIV. OF MED. SCI.
item Rimando, Agnes
item Ignatowicz, Ewa - POZNAN UNIV. OF MED. SCI.

Submitted to: Plant Foods for Human Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 5, 2010
Publication Date: January 27, 2010
Citation: Mikstacka, R., Rimando, A.M., Ignatowicz, E. 2010. Antioxidant Effect of trans-Resveratrol, Pterostilbene, Quercetin and Their Combinations in Human Erythrocytes In Vitro. Plant Foods for Human Nutrition. 65:57-63.

Interpretive Summary: There is evidence that a diet rich in fruit and vegetables may reduce the risk of cancer and other degenerative diseases. It is suggested that the health benefits could be due to the total antioxidant effect of the pool microcomponents in the diet. In this study, the antioxidant activity of three phenolic compounds (trans-resveratrol, pterostilbene and quercetin) was investigated, individually and in combination, using human red blood cells. Pterostilbene and quercetin protected red blood cell membranes against lipid peroxidation (EC50 = 44.5 + or - 7.8 µM and 64 + or - 8.7 µM, respectively). Resveratrol in the concentration up to 200 µM inhibited lipid peroxidation by about 30%. Combinations consisting of two compounds (ratio 1:1) influenced lipid peroxidation in a concentration–dependent manner. Resveratrol in combination with quercetin (2.5-5 µM) or pterostilbene (5-60 µM) inhibited synergistically the lipid peroxidation. At higher concentrations, an additive effect was observed. Combination of quercetin with pterostilbene gave mostly antagonistic effect. This is the first time the synergistic and/or additive antioxidant effect of natural stilbenes and quercetin has been demonstrated. These effects may partially explain the health benefit of fruits containing these phytochemicals.

Technical Abstract: There is evidence that a diet rich in fruit and vegetables may reduce the risk of cancer and other degenerative diseases. Most natural chemopreventive agents display antioxidant activity. However, the potential health impact of the bioactive phytochemicals is limited by their low amount and relatively poor bioavailability. It is suggested that the health benefits associated with fruit and red wine consumption could be due to the whole antioxidant pool of the diet microcomponents. In this study, the antioxidant activities of trans-resveratrol, pterostilbene and quercetin, and the effect of their combination were investigated in human erythrocytes in vitro. H2O2-induced lipid peroxidation was assessed by measuring the amount of thiobarbituric acid reactive species. Quercetin and pterostilbene protected erythrocyte membranes against lipid peroxidation (EC50 values for pterostilbene and quercetin were 44.5 + or - 7.8 µM and 64 + or - 8.7 µM, respectively). Resveratrol in the concentration up to 200 µM inhibited lipid peroxidation by about 30%. Combinations consisting of two compounds (molar ratio 1:1) influenced lipid peroxidation in a concentration–dependent manner. Resveratrol in combination with quercetin (at low concentration 2.5-5 µM) or pterostilbene (5-60 µM) inhibited synergistically the lipid peroxidation; the combination index was <1. At higher concentrations, an additive effect was observed. Combination of quercetin with pterostilbene gave mostly antagonistic effect in the concentration range up to 100 µM. This is the first time the synergistic and/or additive inhibitory effect of natural stilbenes and quercetin on lipid peroxidation has been demonstrated. These effects may partially explain the health benefit of fruits and red wine containing these phytochemicals.

Last Modified: 11/28/2014