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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MICROBIAL CATALYSTS TO PRODUCE FUEL ETHANOL AND VALUE ADDED PRODUCTS Title: Automated production GMAX-L strains of Saccharomyces cereviciae for profitable sustainable cellulosic ethanol production combined with valuable coproduct isolation in mixed biorefinery settings

Authors
item HUGHES, STEPHEN
item DOLL, KENNETH
item MOSER, BRYAN
item Bang, Sookie -
item RICH, JOSEPH
item BISCHOFF, KENNETH
item LIU, SIQING
item QURESHI, NASIB
item HECTOR, RONALD
item DIEN, BRUCE
item COTTA, MICHAEL
item Jones, Marge -

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 27, 2009
Publication Date: January 27, 2009
Citation: Hughes, S.R., Doll, K., Moser, B., Bang, S., Rich, J., Qureshi, N., Hector, R., Dien, B., Cotta, M., Bischoff, K., Liu, S., Jones, M. 2009. Automated production GMAX-L strains of Saccharomyces cereviciae for profitable sustainable cellulosic ethanol production combined with valuable coproduct isolation in mixed biorefinery settings [abstract]. LabAutomation 2009. Abstract No. 109. p. 42.

Technical Abstract: Second generation cellulosic ethanol production is beginning in a variety of formats and using various ethanologenic microbes. The best possibility would be to produce cellulosic ethanol using a Saccharomyces cereviciae that has been engineered to produce ethanol from pentose as well as hexose sugars. A GMAX-L cellulosic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain is under development to use xylose and glucose to produce ethanol from cellulosic hydrolysate and then biodiesel fethyl esters from corn oil and ethanol at the same biorefinery. This strain produces 10-15% more ethanol than a glucose-utilization strain. S. cerevisiae engineered to use xylose and glucose can produce more ethanol than the next best fungal or bacterial ethanologens. Additional work will be performed on this new S. cerevisiae cellulosic ethanologen to express genes that will allow arabinose utilization. Profitability is a major problem with the initial cellulosic refineries since they require expensive and complex assortments of enzymes, both cellulases and hemicellulases, to break down the lignocellulose. For these second generation crossover biorefineries to be sustainable profitable operations they need to overcome the problem of high-cost enzymes to break down lignocellulosic feedstocks. Expressing these enzymes in the cellulosic S. cerevivsiae could dramatically reduce the cost of enzymes required and be used for all ethanol production settings with the benefit of having a secondary valuable biofuel produced.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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