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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUBTROPICAL INSECT PESTS

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Investigations of the feasibility for managing the Asian citrus pysllid using Isaria fumosorosea

Authors
item Avery, P - UNIV OF FLORIDA
item HUNTER, WAYNE
item HALL, DAVID
item JACKSON, MARK
item Powell, C - UNIV OF FLORIDA
item Rogers, M - UNIV OF FLORIDA

Submitted to: International Research Conference on Huanglongbing
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: November 5, 2008
Publication Date: December 1, 2008
Citation: Avery, P.B., Hunter, W.B., Hall, D.G., Jackson, M.A., Powell, C.A., Rogers, M.E. 2008. Investigations of the feasibility for managing the Asian citrus pysllid using Isaria fumosorosea. In: Proceedings of the International Research Conference on Huanglongbing. 11.9, p. 331, December 1-5, 2008, Orlando, Florida. Available: www.plantmanagementnetwork.org.

Interpretive Summary: The Asian citrus psyllid (AsCP), Diaphorina citri, transmits one of the most devastating diseases of citrus, the plant pathogenic bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, which is strongly associated with the occurrence of huanglongbing, also known as citrus greening disease. In Florida, growers are concerned about the ecological and economic ramifications of being dependent upon insecticide applications for the management of the AsCP, the insect vector spreading huanglongbing. In collaboration with citrus growers on the East Coast, we have been evaluating approaches that would be more compatible with current Integrated Pest Management strategies in the long-term. In 2007, Meyer et al. isolated and identified an entomopathogenic fungus found infecting AsCP in citrus groves in Polk. We evaluated the efficacy of different strains of this fungus and the effectiveness of an auto-dissemination technique as an alternative to insecticides for AsCP control. Both greenhouse and field trials strongly support the potential of using these fungi in the management of psyllid populations in Florida citrus.

Technical Abstract: The Asian citrus psyllid (AsCP), Diaphorina citri, transmits one of the most devastating diseases of citrus, the plant pathogenic bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, which is strongly associated with the occurrence of huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease. In Florida, growers are concerned about the ecological and economic ramifications of being dependent upon insecticide applications for the management of the AsCP, the insect vector spreading HLB. In collaboration with citrus growers on the East Coast, we have been evaluating approaches that would be more compatible in the long-term with current IMP practices. In 2007, Meyer et al. isolated and identified an entomopathogenic fungus found infecting AsCP in citrus groves in Polk County as Isaria fumosorosea (= Paecilomyces fumosoroseus) (Ifr). We evaluated the efficacy of two fungal strains of Ifr formulations (ARSEF Ifr 3581 and PFR97 TM 20% WDG) and the effectiveness of an auto-dissemination techniques as an alternative treatment. When Ifr strain 3581 was sprayed on yellow tags which were hung in greenhouses adult psyllids were infected for up to 10 weeks. Both of the strains Ifr 3581 and PFR97 demonstrated the same efficacy when sprayed on citrus trees infested with psyllids. Eggs (33 percent) and nymphs (17-29 percent) were infected. All adult psyllids collected 28 days post spraying were infected with fungi (100 percent). Both greenhouse and field trials strongly support the potential of incorporating these fungi into current IPM management programs to reduce psyllid populations in Florida citrus as a means to reduce spread of HLB.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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