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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENETIC AND IMMUNE STRATEGIES TO CONTROL MUCOSAL PATHOGENS OF SWINE Title: Highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium

Authors
item Santos, I.K.F.M. - UNIV. SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL
item Lunney, Joan
item Ferreira, B.R. - UNIV. SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL

Submitted to: Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 2008
Publication Date: March 15, 2009
Citation: Santos, I., Lunney, J.K., Ferreira, B. 2009. Highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium. Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology. 128:1-6.

Interpretive Summary: Veterinary immunologists worldwide have expanded understanding of the immune systems for our companion animals and developed new vaccines and therapeutics for improving their health and well-being. This manuscript summarizes the highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (8 th IVIS) held August 15th-19th, 2007, in Ouro Preto, Brazil. The 8th IVIS focused on the importance of veterinary immunology for animal health, vaccinology, reproductive immunity and numerous areas of basic and applied immunobiology. It covered a wide range of research on the immune systems of domestic and wild animals, how they are activated and regulated, their functions for defense against pathogens and stress, and their influence by host genetics, endocrinology and nutrition. Research was reported by 390 delegates from 30 countries and covered a wide range of research on the immune systems of domestic and wild animals, how they are activated and regulated, their functions for defense against pathogens and stress, and their influence by host genetics, endocrinology and nutrition. Topics included comparative immunology which sheds light on evolution of the immune system. Tables highlight 1) Key outcomes of the 8th IVIS and 2) Challenges and Opportunities for Veterinary Immunology today. The latter include 1) Investments in basic investigations of species immunology will substantially improve knowledge of animal health and will be essential to improve disease prevention and to aid vaccine developments in veterinary species; 2) Use of genomic information will improve comparative immunological studies and highlight the role of veterinary species as human health and disease models.•3) Probes of how the immune system works at the host-pathogen interface are essential and will lead to an understanding of why certain interactions are species specific but not all?•4) Future studies will transform genome information from both host and pathogens into products for better health and improved food productions systems; and 5) Developments are dependent on the immune Toolkit; without expansion of available immunoreagents for each veterinary species investigations will be curtailed. This meeting underscored the fundamental role of Veterinary Immunology in promoting knowledge, human and animal health and improved production systems.

Technical Abstract: Veterinary immunologists have expanded understanding of the immune systems for our companion animals and developed new vaccines and therapeutics. This manuscript summarizes the highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (8 th IVIS) held August 15th-19th, 2007, in Ouro Preto, Brazil. The 8th IVIS focused on the importance of veterinary immunology for animal health, vaccinology, reproductive immunity and numerous areas of basic and applied immunobiology. It covered a wide range of research on the immune systems of domestic and wild animals, how they are activated and regulated, their functions for defense against pathogens and stress, and their influence by host genetics, endocrinology and nutrition. Tables highlight 1) Key outcomes of the 8th IVIS and 2) Challenges and Opportunities for Veterinary Immunology today. The latter include 1) Investments in basic investigations of species immunology will substantially improve knowledge of animal health and will be essential to improve disease prevention and to aid vaccine developments in veterinary species; 2) Use of genomic information will improve comparative immunological studies and highlight the role of veterinary species as human health and disease models.•3) Probes of how the immune system works at the host-pathogen interface are essential and will lead to an understanding of why certain interactions are species specific but not all?•4) Future studies will transform genome information from both host and pathogens into products for better health and improved food productions systems; and 5) Developments are dependent on the immune Toolkit; without expansion of available immunoreagents for each veterinary species investigations will be curtailed. This meeting underscored the fundamental role of Veterinary Immunology in promoting knowledge, human and animal health and improved production systems.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014