Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Utilisation of Corn (Zea mays) Bran and Corn Fiber in the Production of Food Components

Authors
item Rose, Devin
item INGLETT, GEORGE
item LIU, SEAN

Submitted to: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 17, 2009
Publication Date: March 9, 2010
Citation: Rose, D.J., Inglett, G.E., Liu, S.X. 2010. Utilisation of Corn (Zea mays) Bran and Corn Fiber in the Production of Food Components. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. 90(6):915-924.

Interpretive Summary: Over the past decade, the demand for ethanol, as well as other products of corn milling, such as starches and sweeteners, has increased dramatically. This has brought about a concomitant increase in the production of byproducts from corn milling, such as corn fiber, corn bran, and distillers’ dried grains. Corn fiber is obtained from corn that has been milled to recover the starch and oil. Corn bran is a byproduct of the production of corn meal or flours, which are used to make breads and cereals. Distillers’ dried grains are the residues remaining after fermentation of corn to ethanol by yeasts. These products, which have low economic value, and have been traditionally used for animal feed, may be utilized for the production of more valuable commodities, such as ethanol, xylitol (non-cariogenic sugar substitute), vanillin (vanilla flavor), food gums (thickeners), high dietary fiber or high protein food ingredients, or antioxidant dietary supplements. These applications have been limited by added costs associated with processing; however, with more research underway in this area, the realization of these applications are important. This would provide much needed economic relief for farmers and manufacturers and consumers by decreasing the costs of food and fuel.

Technical Abstract: Over the past decade, the demand for ethanol has increased dramatically. Demand for other products of corn milling, such as starches and sweeteners, is also expected to increase. With the increase in demand for industrial and food use of corn, the production of byproducts, such as corn fiber, corn bran, and distillers’ dried grains, has also increased. New, value-added uses for these byproducts, in addition to their traditional use as animal feed, would provide much needed economic relief for farmers and manufacturers and consumers by decreasing the costs of food and fuel. Therefore, we compiled recent reports surrounding the utilization of corn fiber, corn bran, and distillers’ dried grains with the aim of identifying new potential food and industrial applications of these milling byproducts. New applications include the production of ethanol, xylitol, vanillin, food gums, high dietary fiber or high protein food ingredients, and antioxidant dietary supplements; however, their use for these applications has been limited by added costs associated with processing. More research aimed at broadening the applications for corn milling byproducts is needed.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page