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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: LIVESTOCK LOSSES FROM ABORTIFACIENT AND TERATOGENIC PLANTS

Location: Poisonous Plant Research

Title: The Alkaloid Profiles of Lupinus sulphureus

Authors
item Cook, Daniel
item Lee, Stephen
item Gardner, Dale
item Pfister, James
item Welch, Kevin
item Green, Benedict
item Davis, Thomas
item Panter, Kip

Submitted to: Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 5, 2009
Publication Date: February 1, 2009
Repository URL: http://www.pprl.ars.usda.gov
Citation: Cook, D., Lee, S.T., Gardner, D.R., Pfister, J.A., Welch, K.D., Green, B.T., Davis, T.Z., Panter, K.E. 2009. The Alkaloid Profiles of Lupinus sulphureus. Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, 57(4):1646-1653.

Interpretive Summary: Lupines contain alkaloids that can be toxic and teratogenic causing congenital birth defects (crooked calf disease). The results of this paper show that Lupinus sulphureus has seven distinct alkaloid profiles throughout its geographical distribution. Each alkaloid profile was unique in its geographical distribution and its potential risk to livestock. The results demonstrate than taxonomic identification is not sufficient to determine risk to livestock producers, as chemical characterization of the alkaloids must also be performed.

Technical Abstract: Lupines are common plants found on the rangelands in the western United States. Lupines are known to contain alkaloids that can be toxic and teratogenic causing congenital birth defects (crooked calf disease). One such lupine, Lupinus sulphureus, occurs in parts of Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. Specimens of L. sulphureus from field collections and herbaria were evaluated taxonomically and by chemical means. A total of seven distinct alkaloids profiles and the individual alkaloids associated with each profile were identified. Each alkaloid profile was unique in its geographical distribution and its potential risk to livestock. In conclusion, taxonomic classification is not sufficient to determine risk, as chemical characterization of the alkaloids must also be performed.

Last Modified: 8/29/2014
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