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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SURVEILLANCE AND ECOLOGY OF MOSQUITO, BITING AND FILTH BREEDING INSECTS Title: Evaluation of Six Mosquito Traps for Collection of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) and Associated Mosquito Species in a Suburban Setting in North Central Florida

Authors
item Hoel, David - U.S. NAVY
item Kline, Daniel
item Allan, Sandra

Submitted to: Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 4, 2008
Publication Date: January 20, 2009
Citation: Hoel, D.F., Kline, D.L., Allan, S.A. 2009. Evaluation of Six Mosquito Traps for Collection of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) and Associated Mosquito Species in a Suburban Setting in North Central Florida. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association. 25(1):47-57.

Interpretive Summary: U.S. Navy and USDA, ARS entomologists at the Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology in Gainesville, FL, explored the efficacy of new commercial mosquito traps against older, more traditional surveillance traps, for collecting the recently imported and established mosquito Aedes albopictus (Skuse). Since first being found in Houston, Texas in 1985, Ae. albopictus has spread throughout the southeastern U.S. and north to New Jersey and Chicago and west to Texas and Nebraska. Aedes albopictus is recognized as an important vector of dengue fever viruses worldwide and of dog heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) in the U.S. We compared six adult mosquito traps for effectiveness in collecting Aedes albopictus from suburban backyard, typical of sites used by commercial mosquito trap owners. Trap selection included the Mosquito Professional and Liberty propane traps, two Aedes-specific traps (Fay-Prince and Wilton traps), one experimental trap (MM-X trap), and a standard surveillance CDC light trap that served as a control. Traps that did not generate carbon dioxide were provided with bottled CO2 at a flow rate of 500 ml/min. Commercial traps were baited with lures sold specifically for them, i.e., octenol and lactic acid baits. Results indicate that both commercial traps and the experimental trap (MM-X) are much better surveillance tools for monitoring populations of this important disease vector than are traditional surveillance traps (the CDC light trap) and traps designed to specifically capture Aedes mosquitoes (the Fay-Prince and Wilton traps). These commercial traps offer better collection results, can run for much longer periods of time than traditional traps, and require less maintenance and care than traditional traps.

Technical Abstract: We compared six adult mosquito traps for effectiveness in collecting Aedes albopictus from suburban backyards with the goal of finding a more suitable surveillance replacement for the CDC light trap. Trap selection included two commercial propane traps, two Aedes-specific traps, one experimental trap, and a standard surveillance CDC light trap that served as a control. Traps that did not generate carbon dioxide were provided with bottled CO2 at a flow rate of 500 ml/min. Those traps designed for use with chemical attractants (Mosquito Magnet traps) were optimally baited with Lurex™ (L-lactic acid) and octenol (1-octen-3-ol) commercial baits. Three repetitions of a 6 x 6 Latin square test yielded a total of 37,237 mosquitoes, of which 5,280 (14.2%) were Ae. albopictus. Significantly more (P < 0.05) Ae. albopictus were collected from the experimental and commercial traps (4,244/5,280; 80.3%) than from the CDC light trap and Aedes-specific traps. The Mosquito Magnet Liberty collected the most Ae. albopictus (1,591), accounting for 30.1% of the total take, followed closely by the MM-X trap (1,468) and the MM Pro (1,185). The omni-directional Fay-Prince trap performed better than the CDC or Wilton trap. Twenty-seven mosquito species were collected during these trials; nine species in large enough numbers for meaningful analysis. Aedes albopictus was the second most common mosquito trapped. The results of these trials indicate that propane powered commercial traps would serve as useful substitutes in lieu of CDC traps in Ae. albopictus surveillance efforts.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014