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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MINIMIZING THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF LIVESTOCK MANURES USING INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT REGIMENS

Location: Renewable Energy and Manure Management Research

Title: 35% corn wet distiller's grains plus solubles in steam-flaked and dry-rolled corn finishing diets: Effects on animal performance

Authors
item Macdonald, Jim - TEXAS AGRILIFE RSCH
item Jenkins, Karla - TEXAS AGRILIFE RSCH
item Buttrey, Emalee - TEXAS AGRILIFE EXT
item Lewis, Jennifer - TEXAS AGRILIFE RSCH
item Smith, Steve - TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
item Miller, Rhonda - TEXAS AGRILIFE RSCH
item Lawrence, Ty - WEST TEXAS A&M UNIV
item Mccollum, F. Ted - TEXAS AGRILIFE EXT
item Cole, Noel

Submitted to: Journal of Animal Science
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 30, 2008
Publication Date: March 16, 2009
Citation: MacDonald, J.C., Jenkins, K.H., Buttrey, E., Lewis, J.B., Smith, S.B., Miller, R.K., Lawrence, T.E., McCollum, F., Cole, N.A. 2009. 35% corn wet distiller's grains plus solubles in steam-flaked and dry-rolled corn finishing diets: Effects on animal performance [abstract]. In: Abstracts of 2009 Midwest Section of American Dairy Science Association Conference, March 16-18, 2009, Des Moines, Iowa. Abstract No. 270, p. 85.

Technical Abstract: Fifty-four crossbred steers (308 ± 8 kg) were fed dry-rolled corn (DRC) and steam-flaked corn (SFC) based diets with and without 35% wet distiller's grains plus solubles (WDGS) derived from corn to determine impacts of corn processing method and WDGS inclusion on animal performance and carcass characteristics. The WDGS replaced cottonseed meal, supplemental fat, urea, and corn (DRC or SFC) Steers were individually fed in a Calan-gate system for 174-d. Every 56-d, steers were ultrasonically scanned for backfat thickness and marbling and intravenous blood was collected and analyzed for blood glucose and blood urea nitrogen concentrations. Steers fed SFC-based diets consumed less feed (9.07 vs. 8.37 kg/d for DRC vs. SFC, respectively; P < 0.01) and had improved gain:feed (0.168 vs. 0.186 for DRC vs. SFC, respectively; P < 0.01) compared to steer consuming DRC-based diets. Steers consuming diets containing 35% WDGS had improved feed:gain (0.172 vs. 0.182 for 0% vs. 35% WDGS, respectively; P = 0.03) and produced carcasses with lower percent KPH fat (2.15 vs. 1.84% for 0% vs. 35% WDGS, respectively; P < 0.01) and loins with smaller LM area (86.3 vs. 82.3 cm2 for 0% vs. 35% WDGS, respectively; P = 0.02). The calculated energy value of the WDGS was 103% the value of the SFC used in this study. Average blood glucose concentrations tended to be reduced by feeding SFC compared to DRC (78.2 vs. 75.8 mg/dl for DRC and SFC, respectively; P = 0.13) and were significantly reduced when feeding WDGS (79.1 vs. 74.9 mg/dl for 0% vs. 35% WDGS, respectively; P < 0.01). Blood urea nitrogen concentrations were increased due to feeding SFC compared to DRC (30.2 vs. 32.6 mg/dl for DRC vs. SFC, respectively; P < 0.01) and were increased due to feeding WDGS (26.8 vs. 36.0 mg/dl for 0% vs. 35% WDGS, respectively; P < 0.01). Serial ultrasound measurements indicate cattle consuming diets with WDGS deposit intramuscular fat at a reduced rate late in the feeding period. These data indicate that WDGS have energy values similar to SFC, but may impact carcass characteristics.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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